IEEE USA News
 IEEE-USA
1828 L Street, NW, Suite 1202 - Washington, DC 20036-5104
Tel: +1 202 785 0017 - Fax: +1 202 785 0835
Web: http://www.ieeeusa.org
 
Greg Hill, Member & Electronic Communications Coordinator
g.hill@ieee.org, 202-785-0017, ext. 8335 www.ieeeusa.org
 
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CONTENTS
Dr. Ned Sauthoff Becomes IEEE-USA President
President’s Column, January-February 2001
IEEE-USA Congressional Fellows Begin 2001 Assignments
IEEE-USA WEBZINES ARE LIVE!
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Dr. Ned Sauthoff Becomes IEEE-USA President
 
WASHINGTON, D.C. (2 January 2001) - Dr. Ned Sauthoff of Princeton, N.J.,
became president of The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers -
United States of America (IEEE-USA) on Jan. 1, 2001. He served the past year
as president-elect of the organization.
 
Dr. Sauthoff is a physicist who heads the Off-site Research Department
of the United States Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics
Laboratory (PPPL) in Plainsboro, N.J. He began his career there after he
earned a Ph.D. in astrophysics from Princeton University in 1975. He has
headed numerous departments at PPPL, including the Physics Department from
1992-94, and the Plasma Science and Technology Department from 1994-97.
 
As president, Dr. Sauthoff is the highest-ranking volunteer member of
IEEE-USA and will chair its board of directors. He will also serve at the
international level on the IEEE executive committee and board of directors.
He succeeds Merrill Buckley of Springfield, Pa., and will work closely with
Buckley and 2002 President-Elect LeEarl Bryant of Richardson, Texas.
Dr. Sauthoff said he plans to work with IEEE-USA volunteers and staff to
realize the great potential for electrotechnology and information technology
to improve the quality of life.
 
"We will address that mission both by building careers and by shaping
public policy," he said. "IEEE, as the leading technological professional
society in the world, has a responsibility to serve by providing both
authoritative perspectives to decision makers and professional development
tools to our members.
 
"IEEE-USA provides those services to U.S. decision makers and to its
more than 230,000 members. In 2001, we will provide improved tools to a
greater number of our members and will enhance our public-policy grassroots
outreach by engaging our geographically dispersed membership in all U.S.
Congressional districts."
 
Dr. Sauthoff pointed out that in the area of building careers, IEEE-USA
sponsors conferences and symposia; develops and disseminates
career-development tools; argues for a strong U.S. engineering workforce
through programs ranging from pre-college to continuing education, to
permanent immigration; and supports pension portability for a mobile
workforce. In the area of technology policy, IEEE-USA works for reliable
restructuring of the electric supply industry; strong research and
development through both industrial tax incentives and federal funding; fair
intellectual property rights in today's economy; and privacy and reliability
of the information infrastructure.
 
In 1998-99, Dr. Sauthoff served as IEEE-USA vice president of Technology
Policy Activities. He began his work with IEEE-USA's Technology Policy
Council (TPC) in 1988 and by 1997 had risen to TPC vice-chair. He was
presented the IEEE-USA Divisional Professional Leadership Award in 1996 in
recognition of his accomplishments as chair of the organization's Energy
Policy Committee in 1994-95.
 
Dr. Sauthoff received a bachelor's degree in physics in 1971 and a
master's in nuclear engineering in 1972, both from the Massachusetts
Institute of Technology. He has held his current position at PPPL since
1997. The laboratory is the largest facility in the U.S. studying the
physics of the high-temperature gases, called plasmas, which are used to
create fusion energy -- an attractive energy source for the future. The PPPL
is funded by the DOE and managed by Princeton University.
 
For more background information on Dr. Sauthoff, visit
http://www.ieeeusa.org/volunteers/sauthoff.html.
 
 
President’s Column, January-February 2001
Ned R. Sauthoff, 2001 IEEE-USA President
 
Communications Play Key Role in Building Careers and Shaping Public Policy
 
Recent blackouts and power shortages in California, the Northwest, Midwest, Northeast and Florida have demonstrated that electric power policy has a large impact on the public benefits of electrotechnology. The IEEE and its members -- leaders in electrotechnology and information technology -- have key roles to play in maximizing the public benefit of our field. Achieving that goal entails more than technical work, it requires involvement by members in the public-policy process.
 
Similarly, career success for today’s mobile engineer demands both technical and non-technical skills and a supportive policy environment.
 
To support our members both individually and collectively, IEEE-USA is working hard to increase the availability of our quality professional development programs and to increase the effectiveness of our government relations programs. We do this by focusing on the highest-impact issues and by engaging our geographically dispersed U.S. members in grassroots activism.
 
Communication is key to making our programs more available, and to engaging members in public-policy programs. Based on surveys and studies of member preference, we have designed a comprehensive IEEE-USA member communications program. At the forefront of our efforts are the new magapaper IEEE-USA News and Views, and two insightful monthly Web-based magazines (Webzines), IEEE-USA Today’s Engineer and IEEE-USA Policy Perspectives.
 
Here’s a more in-depth look at each one:
 
News and Views, the lynchpin of our new communications efforts, is a quarterly print publication that will debut in March. It will feature articles that help you build your career and alert you to IEEE-USA products and activities that help shape public policy in the areas of career policy and technology policy. It will also include pointers to material available in previous Webzine issues and will be delivered with your copy of The Institute and Spectrum.
 
Today’s Engineer replaces the award-winning print publication by the same name that was available through subscription only. It provides information on careers in electrotechnology and information technology, on products useful for building your career, and on professional development for today’s engineer. It appeared for the first time in January.
 
Policy Perspectives addresses topics in both career policy and technology policy, including the status of pending legislation, IEEE-USA position statements and opportunities for you to act. It also began in January.
 
Both Webzines can be found at http://www.todaysengineer.org. Each one has an "opt-in" notification service, where you can sign up to receive an e-mail when each new issue of Today’s Engineer and Policy Perspectives is posted on the IEEE-USA Web site. For this service, go to http://www.todaysengineer.org/emailupdates.
 
You, the member, are the most effective messengers of the perspectives of engineers to your congressional representatives and senators. As former Speaker of the House Tip O’Neill once said, "All politics is local." Our electronic grassroots outreach program enables you to monitor and act on developing legislation and issues that affect our members and the engineering profession. You can receive legislative alerts on specific issues of interest at www.ieeeusa.org/forum/grassroots. And you can have news delivered your in-box by subscribing to IEEE-USA’s Eye on Washington electronic newsletter at http://www.ieeeusa.org/emailupdates.
 
Our Policy Forum (http://www.ieeeusa.org/forum) and Legislative Action Center (http://congress.nw.dc.us/ieeeusa) provide a variety of tools and resources to help educate you about the issues, prepare a letter to your congressperson, or arm you with material for a visit to your congressperson’s district office.
 
 
These communications vehicles play a key role in IEEE-USA’s mission to build careers and shape public policy. In the area of building careers, IEEE-USA sponsors conferences and symposia; develops and disseminates career-development tools; argues for a strong U.S. engineering workforce through programs ranging from pre-college to continuing education, to permanent immigration; and supports pension portability for a mobile workforce. In the area of technology policy, IEEE-USA works for reliable restructuring of the electric supply industry; strong research and development through both industrial tax incentives and federal funding; fair intellectual property rights in today’s economy; and privacy and reliability of the information infrastructure.
 
So I encourage you to utilize the communications tools we have provided. Because electrotechnology and information technology carry great potential for improving the public’s quality of life, it is up to us to communicate our important messages both inside and outside the profession. We each have a responsibility to serve by providing both authoritative perspectives to decision makers and professional development tools to our members. Here’s to a great 2001.
 
 
IEEE-USA Congressional Fellows Begin 2001 Assignments
 
WASHINGTON (22 January 2001) - Dr. Peter Winokur, Jason Remer and Dr.
Russell Lefevre have begun their IEEE-USA Congressional Fellowships with the
107th Congress. Each will be advising a member of Congress on key
electrotechnology issues.
 
"I can't imagine a more exciting time to be involved in the political
process than this upcoming year," Remer said. "Technology policymaking is
sure to play a major role in Congress this year, especially in light of the
increase in e-commerce, Internet security issues and electric power
deregulation."
 
Dr. Winokur, manager for radiation technology and assurance at Sandia
National Laboratory in Albuquerque, is working in the office of Sen. Harry
Reid (D-Nev.) on renewable energy and technology issues. Sen. Reid is
ranking member of the Environment and Public Works Committee and the Energy
and Water Appropriations Subcommittee. Dr. Winokur will work on legislation
to promote the development of clean, renewable energy sources such as wind,
biomass (plant materials and animal waste), sunshine and geothermal heat.
 
Remer, a design engineering supervisor for Entergy's Arkansas Nuclear
One plant outside of Russellville, Ark., is supporting Rep. Joe Barton
(R-Texas) on national energy policy issues. Rep. Barton, whose district is
in the Dallas-Ft. Worth area, is Chairman of the newly organized Energy and
Air Quality Subcommittee of the Energy and Commerce Committee. Remer will
assist Barton on national energy strategy, nuclear energy and electric power
restructuring issues.
 
Dr. Lefevre, vice president of Technology Services Corporation in Los
Angeles, is advising Sen. John D. Rockefeller (D-W.V.) on science and
technology issues. Sen. Rockefeller serves on the Senate Commerce, Science
and Transportation Committee and is ranking member of the Aviation
subcommittee. Dr. Lefevre will lend his expertise in a number of scientific
areas, including alternate fuels, electric vehicles, frequency spectrum
allocation and aviation safety.
 
IEEE-USA's Congressional Fellows join Dr. Saj Durrani, whose IEEE-USA
Executive Fellowship with the Federal Communications Commission's Office of
Engineering and Technology runs through June 2001.
I
EEE-USA Congressional Fellows accept a one-year appointment to share
their scientific and technical knowledge by working on the staff of a U.S.
Congressperson or Congressional committee. This advisory role provides an
engineer's perspective on public policy issues.
 
IEEE-USA is accepting applications for 2002 Congressional and FCC
Fellowships through Feb. 23, 2001. For more information on both
opportunities, visit the Government Fellowships web page at
http://www.ieeeusa.org/forum/govfel or contact Chris Brantley at
c.brantley@ieee.org.
 
 
IEEE-USA WEBZINES ARE LIVE!
 
IEEE-USA has posted on the web the first issues of its new monthly web
publications IEEE-USA TODAY'S ENGINEER and IEEE-USA POLICY PERSPECTIVES.
You are invited to read them and to sign up for monthly alerts when new
issues are posted.
 
IEEE-USA TODAY'S ENGINEER includes feature articles and short blurbs with
career guidance, tips, strategies and solutions for all sectors of the
profession. It will encompass the latest on IEEE-USA's career enhancement
products and services.
See for yourself at: <http://www.todaysengineer.org/careerfocus>.
 
IEEE-USA POLICY PERSPECTIVES includes timely articles and commentary on the
topics that are shaping legislation, the technology workplace, and the
engineering world. We'll also provide you with the information you need to
get involved as well as to contribute your expertise and your voice to the
decision-making process. See for yourself at: <
http://www.todaysengineer.org/policyperspectives>.
 
In the premier issue of TODAY'S ENGINEER, read former EE TIMES' Profession
Editor Bob Bellinger's article on stealth job hunting -- how you can be
among the most desirable candidates by *not* actively pursuing a new
position through the IEEE's new job site to be activated in February. In
the same 'zine, go to CPA Michele Riley's article on how to evaluate stock
options as part of a corporate package in today's more volatile stock
market. Further, IEEE Senior Research Historian Rik Nebeker looks at how
neon lighting has lit up popular culture. And IEEE Member and author Todd
Yuzuriha explains how to use humor effectively in the workplace.
 
In the premier issue of POLICY PERSPECTIVES, IEEE Life Fellow Jack Casazza
seeks member support in shaping electric power policy. In the same 'zine, a
reader poll requests opinions on the relevance to U.S. plants of the
Japanese concept of *kaizen* that encompasses total quality control,
continuous process improvement , error-free production, and just-in-time
delivery. In addition, IEEE-USA's public policy agenda for the 107th
Congress is detailed. And a Reader Feedback section includes several
letters from IEEE members on what the PE license means for engineers.
 
Sign up now for monthly reminders of the webzines' publication. Go to <
http://www.todaysengineer.org/emailupdates>.
 
See for yourself how IEEE-USA's new webzines will help you identify the
skills and issues that will have the greatest impact on your career, as
well as relate your career to the many technology and public-policy issues
being discussed at the local, state and national levels.
 
 
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IEEE-USA is an organizational unit of the IEEE created in 1973 to
promote the careers and public-policy interests of the more than 230,000
electrical, electronics, computer and software engineers who are U.S.
members of the IEEE. The IEEE is the world's largest technical professional
society with over 360,000 members in 150 countries. For more information,
visit us online at http://www.ieeeusa.org.
  
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IEEE-USA
1828 L Street, NW, Suite 1202
Washington, DC 20036-5104
Tel: +1 202 785 0017
Fax: +1 202 785 0835
Web: http://www.ieeeusa.org
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Updated 01/30/2001