IEEE USA News
 IEEE-USA
1828 L Street, NW, Suite 1202 - Washington, DC 20036-5104
Tel: +1 202 785 0017 - Fax: +1 202 785 0835
Web: http://www.ieeeusa.org
 
Greg Hill, Member & Electronic Communications Coordinator
g.hill@ieee.org, 202-785-0017, ext. 8335 www.ieeeusa.org
 
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CONTENTS
- IIEEE-USA Endorses Comprehensive Retirement Security and Pension Reform Act, Introduced in the House Today
- Shaping Technology Policy:
- FY 2002 BUDGET PROPOSAL PUTS BRAKES ON R&D GROWTH
- IEEE-USA 2002 PRESIDENT-ELECT CANDIDATES GO ON-LINE
- NEW POSITION STATEMENTS AVAILABLE ON-LINE
- IEEE-USA ENDORSES ENERGY RELIABILITY LEGISLATION
- BOEHLERT NAMES COMMITTEE AND SUBCOMMITTEE VICE CHAIRS
- IEEE-USA OFFERS BUSH ADMINISTRATION ADVICE, ASSISTANCE
- CCIP POSITION STATEMENTS BOOKLET AVAILABLE FROM IEEE-USA
- MARCH 2001 'IEEE-USA POLICY PERSPECTIVES' IS LIVE
- Building Careers:
- ORDER YOUR 2001 IEEE-USA SALARY & FRINGE BENEFITS SURVEY NOW
- REGISTER NOW FOR THE 2001 IEEE-USA CONSULTANTS DATABASE
- MARCH 2001 'IEEE-USA TODAY'S ENGINEER' IS LIVE
- Volunteer News, Opportunities & Conferences
- IEEE-USA WORKSHOP SET FOR 27-29 APRIL
- JOIN US FOR 2001 CONGRESSIONAL SE&T VISITS DAY
- IEEE-USA SEEKS NOMINATIONS FOR 2002-2003 OFFICES
- NAE SEEKS INPUT ON INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH ISSUES
- Promoting Public Awareness of Engineering:
- E-WEEK'S 50TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION HIGHLIGHTS
- IEEE FOUNDATION COMMITS FUNDING FOR SECOND 2001 S&E MASS MEDIA FELLOW
- ENGINEERING A BETTER QUALITY OF LIFE: AD CAMPAIGN
- INVENTION DIMENSION: SCIENCE, ENGINEERING AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP
 
- CED Releases Report on Immigration Reform, IEEE-USA Agrees with Most of the Findings
- IEEE-USA/AAES Seeks $10 Billion for Support of
Department of Defense Science and Technology Program
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Top of Page
 

IEEE-USA Endorses Comprehensive Retirement Security and Pension Reform Act, Introduced in the House Today

WASHINGTON (14 March 2001) – IEEE-USA strongly endorses the Comprehensive Retirement Security and Pension Reform Act introduced in the House of Representatives today by Congressmen Rob Portman (R-Ohio) and Ben Cardin (D-Md.).

"Increases in retirement savings-plan contribution limits and improvements in pension portability – like the ones in this bill – are urgently needed," said Dr. Timothy Grayson, who chairs IEEE-USA’s Engineering Employment Benefits Committee. "This will enable increasingly mobile American workers, including engineers and scientists, to save more for retirement and to take their earned benefits with them when they change jobs in today’s fast-moving economy."

The Portman-Cardin bill, which enjoyed broad bipartisan support in the last Congress, passed the House twice last year (401 to 25 on July 19th and 401 to 20 on September 19th). The pension reform provisions were also included in an omnibus House-Senate tax relief package that was debated, but not enacted, in the closing days of the 106th Congress. The new bill will:

Increase the current $2,000 contribution limit (established in 1981) for deductible and non-deductible IRAs to $5,000 in $1,000 annual increments.

Increase 401(k), 403(b), section 457 and salary-reduction Simplified Employee Pension (SEP) contribution limits from $10,500 to $15,000 and SIMPLE contribution limits from $6,000 to $10,000.

Allow older workers to make "catch-up" contributions of up to $5,000 a year to 401(k)-type plans and up to $1,500 to IRAs.

Reduce vesting requirements for employer matching contributions to defined contribution plans from 5 to 3 years and improve pension portability by facilitating transfers of earned benefits among and between defined-contribution plans and IRAs.

IEEE-USA’s Grayson cited U.S. Department of Labor research findings that two-thirds of American workers who participate in employer-sponsored plans can lose as much as 50 percent of their benefits under current patterns of job mobility and pension coverage. The Portman-Cardin proposal will help fix that problem by making it easier to transfer earned benefits from one employer’s plan to another when workers change jobs, and from one employment sector to another if they change careers.

"Although I’m looking forward to a productive career with my current employer, statistics indicate that I’m likely to change jobs three or four more times before I retire," Grayson said. "Unless I can transfer my earned benefits to future employer’s plans or roll them over into an IRA, I stand to lose a substantial part of my retirement savings."

Grayson joined other national engineering society representatives in praising Congressmen Portman and Cardin (and the 228 other Republican, Democratic and Independent co-sponsors) for crafting such a comprehensive pension reform proposal. In addition to raising contribution limits and improving pension portability, the Portman-Cardin bill will help to expand pension coverage by simplifying complex minimum distribution, non-discrimination and top-heavy rules.

"These burdensome regulatory requirements currently discourage many employers – especially small and mid-sized businesses – from offering retirement savings programs for their employees," Grayson said.

 

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Shaping Technology Policy:
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FY 2002 BUDGET PROPOSAL PUTS BRAKES ON R&D GROWTH
President Bush submitted the "blueprint" of his $2 trillion FY 2002 budget
proposal to Congress in February. Consistent with the President's pledge to
slow federal spending, the proposal would significantly reduce federal
support of research and development, especially for non-defense engineering
and health-related programs. The cuts are proposed in favor of increased
spending on education and defense, and to ease the passage of Bush's
proposed broad tax cut.
Among the notable reductions proposed under the Bush plan, the $190 million
Advanced Technology Program would be cut from the Commerce Department
budget, and initiatives to bridge the "digital divide," by providing
computers and Internet access to underprivileged families and schools,
would be reduced by 65 percent. In contrast, the NIH budget would receive
an increase of 15 percent, or $2.8 billion. And funding for e-government
initiative, FirstGov, would be ramped up from $10 million to $100 million
over three years. The FirstGov portal (www.firstgov.gov) was established by
the Clinton Administration to act as a gateway for accessing the Federal
Government's numerous agencies online. A big improvement in education would
be the expansion of the Education Savings Accounts from $500 to $5000, and
expansion of tax exemption to all prepaid college tuition plans, not just
those at public schools.
Congress now has until September to reach a compromise with the Bush
Administration on the proposal. Check out the latest on the budget at:
<http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/budget/text/index.html>.
 
IEEE-USA supports increases in federal R&D funding -- especially for
support of applied research, engineering and the physical sciences in both
the civilian and defense agencies. IEEE-USA urges concerned individuals and
groups to contact Congress in support of the R&D budget. Find out how at
the IEEE-USA Legislative Action Center: <http://congress.nw.dc.us/ieee/>.
 
IEEE-USA 2002 PRESIDENT-ELECT CANDIDATES GO ON-LINE
James Leonard and Joseph Lillie, candidates for IEEE-USA President-Elect,
have launched websites to highlight their platforms and qualifications for
office. Be sure to visit their sites before you vote in September:
James Leonard <http://www.stlieee.org/leonard/>
Joseph Lillie < http://www.solutionsmall.com/lillie/>
For more information on IEEE-USA's annual elections, visit the IEEE-USA
Election Center at: <http://www.ieeeusa.org/election/>.
 
NEW POSITION STATEMENTS AVAILABLE ON-LINE
Five new position statements, as revised and approved by the IEEE-USA Board
of Directors at their 15 February meeting, are now available on-line:
- Opposing Use of Universal Identifiers
<http://www.ieeeusa.org/forum/positions/universalidentifiers.html>
- Internet Content Filtering
<http://www.ieeeusa.org/forum/positions/contentfiltering.html>
- Telecommunications Access Infrastructure
<http://www.ieeeusa.org/forum/positions/telecomaccess.html>
- Universal Service
<http://www.ieeeusa.org/forum/positions/universalservice.html>
- Optimized Use of Federal Laboratories
<http://www.ieeeusa.org/forum/positions/fedlabs.html>
In addition, the 1997 statement on High Definition Television was withdrawn
and has been removed from our on-line archive.
IEEE-USA position statements are developed by IEEE-USA volunteer committees
on issues of concern to IEEE's U.S. members. For more information, visit
<http://www.ieeeusa.org/forum/POSITIONS/>.
 
IEEE-USA ENDORSES ENERGY RELIABILITY LEGISLATION
IEEE-USA sent a letter, dated 6 March, to the House and Senate Energy
Committees expressing support for "prompt passage of legislation to promote
and ensure the continued reliability of the electric grid in the United
States and throughout North America." The IEEE-USA Energy Policy Committee
(EPC) is monitoring closely several key pieces of legislation being
considered by the 107th Congress that would address the three basic
concerns it sees with the present state of the country's power grid:
 
- The ongoing decline in the quality and reliability of electric power will
seriously impact the nation's economy
- No individual state is large enough to simultaneously assure the economic
efficiency and reliable operation of the electric power infrastructure
- Reliability and economic efficiency can only be achieved at the regional
and national level
Read the full letter on-line at:
<http://www.ieeeusa.org/forum/POLICY/01march06.html>
For more information on the EPC and IEEE-USA's policy activities, visit:
<http://www.ieeeusa.org/forum>.
 
BOEHLERT NAMES COMMITTEE AND SUBCOMMITTEE VICE CHAIRS
House Science Committee Chairman Sherwood Boehlert (R-N.Y.) announced the
following appointments of committee and subcommittee vice chairs last week:
Full Committee - Rep. Gil Gutknecht (R-Minn.)
Energy Subcommittee - Rep. Melissa A. Hart (R-Pa.)
Environment Subcommittee - Rep. Felix J. Grucci (R-N.Y.)
Research Subcommittee - Rep. Timothy V. Johnson (R-Ill.)
Space Subcommittee - Rep. Dave Weldon (R-Fla.)
Boehlert said he is looking forward to an active two years. In a press
release announcing the appointments, he said: "We have a very able team on
both sides of the aisle and I expect the 107th Congress to be very
productive for the Science Committee. I am particularly impressed with the
abilities reflected in our vice chairs."
 
IEEE-USA OFFERS BUSH ADMINISTRATION ADVICE, ASSISTANCE
In a letter dated 22 February, IEEE-USA President Ned R. Sauthoff offered
to advise/assist the Bush Administration on matters of science and
technology through the auspices of IEEE-USA. Sauthoff believes engineers
can play an important role in "helping policy-makers grapple with the
technical implications of complex issues" by identifying qualified
candidates for federal appointments; providing experts to serve on federal
advisory committees; organizing workshops and symposia to focus attention
on key S&T topics of concern to the new Administration, and providing
briefings and background information. Read the letter online at:
<http://www.ieeeusa.org/forum/POLICY/01feb22.html>.
 
CCIP POSITION STATEMENTS BOOKLET AVAILABLE FROM IEEE-USA
The IEEE-USA Committee on Communications & Information Policy has combined
its position statements into one 76-page booklet. The issues range from
Computer Crime to Information Security in Electric Power. For your copy,
contact IEEE-USA's Debbie Rudolph at mailto:d.rudolph@ieee.org.
 
MARCH 2001 'IEEE-USA POLICY PERSPECTIVES' IS LIVE
The March 2001 edition of 'IEEE-USA POLICY PERSPECTIVES' is available now
on the Web. POLICY PERSPECTIVES is IEEE-USA's monthly, policy oriented
webzine, offering articles and commentary on the topics that are shaping
legislation, the technology workplace, and the engineering world. Check it
out at:
<http://www.todaysengineer.org/policyperspectives/index.html>
 
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Building Careers:
*******************
ORDER YOUR 2001 IEEE-USA SALARY & FRINGE BENEFITS SURVEY NOW
The IEEE-USA Salary & Fringe Benefits Survey, 2001-2002 Edition, can be
ordered now at the special IEEE member pre-publication price of $64.95. The
definitive salary and reference guide for technical professionals, the
survey is being conducted on-line this year for the first time. The number
of members being surveyed has more than doubled to 80,000, which promises
to yield more useful data for the report. Scheduled to be shipped in May,
the regular member price of $74.95 will take effect ($149.95 for
non-members) at that time. To order, call 1-800-678-IEEE (4333), and ask
for UH-2990.
 
REGISTER NOW FOR THE 2001 IEEE-USA CONSULTANTS DATABASE
Get your consulting practice off to the right start this year by
registering for the 2001 IEEE-USA Database of Electrotechnology and
Information-Technology Consultants. Last year, more than 30,000 visitors
searched the consultants database on the Web -- a 100 percent increase over
1999. Register now at www.ieeeusa-consultants.org to establish or renew
your listing in the database for one year. Cost remains only $65 for IEEE
members ($90 for non-members). As a bonus, registrants who enroll by 1 May
will receive two copies of the database on CD-ROM, at no extra charge -- a
great tool for using the database while traveling, and the perfect
"give-away" to a prospective client.
 
MARCH 2001 'IEEE-USA TODAY'S ENGINEER' IS LIVE
The March 2001 edition of 'IEEE-USA TODAY'S ENGINEER' is available now on
the Web. TODAY'S ENGINEER is IEEE-USA's monthly, career-oriented webzine,
offering feature articles and short blurbs with career guidance, tips,
strategies and solutions for all sectors of the profession. Check it out
at:
<http://www.todaysengineer.org/careerfocus/index.html>
 
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Volunteer News, Opportunities & Conferences:
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IEEE-USA WORKSHOP SET FOR 27-29 APRIL
IEEE-USA committees and PACE volunteers will meet 27-29 April in Tampa,
Fla. to discuss professional activities, skills, services, government
relations programs, and upcoming projects. IEEE-USA expects that this
workshop will serve to:
- Develop PACE project plans and metrics to be implemented at the local
section or chapter level
- Improve dissemination of information, products and services to local
sections and chapters throughout the PACE network
- Provide PACE network leaders with new skills for successful meetings with
legislators
- Develop a Grassroots Lobbying Network within PACE
For more information, visit:
<http://www.ieeeusa.org/conferences/2001workshop/index.html>.
 
JOIN US FOR 2001 CONGRESSIONAL S&T VISITS DAY
IEEE-USA asks the IEEE's U.S. members to join hundreds of other engineers
and scientists for 2001 Congressional Visits Day (CVD), 1-2 May in
Washington, D.C. CVD stresses the long-term importance of science and
technology to the nation's health and economy through meetings with
congressional decision-makers.
 
IEEE-USA's Technology Policy Activities Council will coordinate meetings on
the Hill for participating IEEE members. CVD provides an excellent
opportunity for new IEEE volunteers with an interest in public policy to
get involved with IEEE-USA's government relations. To volunteer for 2001
Congressional Visits Day, or for more information, visit
http://www.ieeeusa.org/forum/cvd/index.html or contact Deborah Rudolph at
mailto:d.rudolph@ieee.org.
 
IEEE-USA SEEKS NOMINATIONS FOR 2002-2003 OFFICES
IEEE-USA's Nominations and Appointments (N&A) Committee has issued a Call
for Nominations for the following IEEE-USA elected positions:
President-Elect (2003)
Member-at-Large (2003-2004)
Secretary-Treasurer (2002)
Vice President, Career Activities (2002)
Vice President, Member Activities (2002)
Vice President, Professional Activities (2002)
Vice President, Technology Policy Activities (2002)
These officers help direct the day-to-day operations of IEEE-USA --
providing leadership for programs and volunteer committees, overseeing
IEEE-USA's financial performance, and promoting new member services and
activities. Nominees must be IEEE Senior Member grade or higher, and reside
in IEEE Regions 1-6. The N&A Committee is especially interested in
nominations of Senior members who are also Graduates of the Last Decade
(GOLD).
The formal nomination deadline is 15 May 2001, although the N&A Committee
welcomes recommendations for qualified candidates year-round. Nomination
forms and detailed position descriptions are available on-line at
http://www.ieeeusa.org/election/nominations.html or can be obtained from
Michell Scott at mailto:m.scott@ieee.org or by contacted the IEEE-USA Washington
office.
 
NAE SEEKS INPUT ON INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH ISSUES
In January, the American Association of Engineering Societies
(AAES)received a letter from Harold Forsen Foreign Secretary of the
National Academy of Engineering (NAE). The National Research Council's
International Advisory Board is interested in any work done by AAES member
societies on a number of topics, including:
 
- Disposal Strategy for High-Level Russian Nuclear Waste
- Remote Sensing in Foreign Affairs
- Information Technology and Its Evolution in Developing Countries
- The Megacities Initiative
- Energy Supply/Demand in Developing Countries
- Improving Agriculture Productivity in Africa
 
IEEE is a member society of AAES. If you know of any IEEE committee or
society that is active in these areas, please pass this along. Any
information can be sent to Harold Forsen at the NAE at 2101 Constitution
Avenue, N.W., Washington, D.C., 20418; or call +1 202 334 3603.
 
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Promoting Public Awareness of Engineering:
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E-WEEK'S 50TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION HIGHLIGHTS
In February, the nation's capital played host to a number of events
centered around the 50th anniversary celebration of National Engineers Week
(E-Week). Every year, E-Week unites engineers from all disciplines for a
weeklong, nationwide celebration of the countless ways engineers touch the
lives of all Americans. Some highlights:
- The National Academies of Engineering presented their top awards at a
gala black-tie ceremony at Union Station, in Washington, D.C. The $500,000
Charles Stark Draper Prize, often referred to as the Nobel Prize of
engineering, was awarded to the inventors of the Internet, Vinton Cerf,
Robert Kahn, Leonard Kleinrock and Lawrence Roberts. Cerf, Kahn and
Kleinrock are all IEEE Fellows. The new biennial Dolores H. Russ Prize,
also worth $500,000, was presented to Earl Bakken and Wilson Greatbatch for
their invention of the first human pacemaker. For more information, visit:
<http://nationalacademies.org/>.
 
- The 21 Future City Competition regional finalists met in the capital to
compete for the national championship. St. Barnabas Catholic School
(Chicago, IL) took top honors for their design -- "Maropolis" -- a floating
city of the future built on a platform ship five miles square. Medford
(Okla.) Public School took home the inaugural IEEE-USA Best Communications
System Award, presented by IEEE-USA President Ned R. Sauthoff and David
Pierce, IEEE-USA PACE Committee Chair. For more E-Week coverage, visit:
<http://www.ieeeusa.org/eweek/>.
 
- The E-Week organizers launched an online travel guide -- A Sightseer's
Guide to Engineering -- at <http://www.engineeringsights.org>. The Guide
is designed to help kids and adults add some engineering wonders to their
vacation itineraries. IEEE-USA enlisted the help of the IEEE History
Center, which submitted several dozen sites for consideration -- many of
which appear in the Guide. Visit the IEEE History Center online at:
<http://www.ieee.org/organizations/history_center/index.html>.
 
- In a special Presidential Message concerning the observation of National
Engineers Week (18-24 February), President George W. Bush praised
engineers, noting that "these dedicated men and women continue to lead our
Nation to a better future." Read the letter at:
<http://www.eweek.org/2000/News/Features/bush.shtml>.
 
IEEE FOUNDATION COMMITS FUNDING FOR SECOND 2001 S&E MASS MEDIA FELLOW
At its March meeting, the IEEE Foundation's Board of Directors allocated an
additional $78K to fund projects addressing a number of goals, including
"improving the public's understanding and appreciation of engineering."
Responding to that initiative, the Foundation awarded an $8K grant to
IEEE-USA. The grant allows the IEEE-USA Communication Committee to sponsor
two students in the AAAS Mass Media Science and Engineering Fellows Program
in 2001.
 
The program's goal is to strengthen the connection between science and the
media, and to enhance coverage of science-related issues in the media in
order to improve the public understanding and appreciation of science and
technology. For a ten-week period each summer, the program places advanced
science and engineering students in media outlets throughout the country to
work as reporters, researchers and production assistants. IEEE-USA's first
Media Fellow, Elan Ruskin, spent last summer working as a cub reporter for
the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, covering a vast array of sci/tech issues. For
more information on the Media Fellows Program, visit:
<http://ehrweb.aaas.org/ehr/MassMedia0719.html>
 
ENGINEERING A BETTER QUALITY OF LIFE: AD CAMPAIGN
Throughout the month of February, the American Association of Engineering
Societies (AAES) will place a series of seven ads in newspapers throughout
the country. One of the key objectives of the ad campaign is to improve
public perception of engineers of all disciplines by highlighting
engineering contributions to the quality of life. The ads emphasize the
role engineers play in enhancing health care, improving the environment,
and making our homes and workplaces safer and more comfortable.
 
As a member society of AAES and the AAES Engineering Alliance, IEEE-USA is
pleased to have been able to participate in the planning and funding of
this important public awareness effort. To find out more, visit:
<http://www.aaes.org/content.cfm?L1=3&L2=1>.
 
INVENTION DIMENSION: SCIENCE, ENGINEERING AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP
The Lemelson-MIT Program is an MIT-administered program launched in 1994 by
the late Jerome H. Lemelson and his wife, Dorothy. According to the
program's website, called Invention Dimension, the program's mission is "to
inspire a new generation of American scientists, engineers and
entrepreneurs by celebrating, through awards and educational activities,
living role models in these fields." Invention Dimension serves as a
clearinghouse for information about inventors and inventing, and can be

found at: <http://web.mit.edu/invent>.

 

CED Releases Report on Immigration Reform,

IEEE-USA Agrees with Most of the Findings

WASHINGTON (26 March 2001) – The Committee for Economic Development, a non-profit, non-partisan organization representing Fortune 500 business leaders and university presidents, issued a report, Reforming Immigration: Helping Meet America’s Need for a Skilled Workforce, at the National Press Club on March 21. The report concludes that the United States’ employment-based admissions programs, both permanent and temporary, are in desperate need of repair. Action is needed now if the U.S. it to meet continuing needs for skilled labor at a time when its domestic workforce is rapidly aging.

"If U.S. workers are unable to meet the increasing demand for high-tech positions, then we favor immigration policies that will help U.S. companies remain competitive in the global marketplace," said IEEE-USA Past President (1999) Paul Kostek, who served as a non-trusteed member of CED’s Immigration Subcommittee. "If we must bring in skilled foreign workers, we believe they should come to the U.S. as permanent residents rather than as ‘guest workers’ under H-1B and other temporary admissions programs.

"In short, IEEE-USA supports green cards, not guest workers."

While IEEE-USA agrees that our nation’s immigration system must be reformed, it continues to insist that immigration should be viewed as a supplement to – not a substitute for – concerted public and private effort to improve our nation’s technological capability. The latter can be accomplished through more effective education, training and life-long learning, and better management and utilization of American workers, including engineers and scientists.

"Although a more market-sensitive immigration system will contribute to a strong American economy," said Shelly Jones, co-chair of CED’s Immigration Subcommittee, "it cannot replace effective basic education and training as the main source of a skilled workforce."

IEEE-USA supports the CED’s recommendation to rationalize permanent, employment-based admissions by replacing time-consuming and ineffective labor certifications with an expedited attestation requirement, coupled with random audits to ensure compliance and strengthen accountability.

The CED report found that the up to 10-year wait for full approval of a permanent employee visa has resulted in a backlog of over 1 million "green card" applicants, while nearly half the annual allotment of these visas go unused. This has distorted the H-1B temporary visa system and made it a backdoor for foreign nationals seeking permanent admission. The CED recommends reducing the term of H-1B visas from six years to three and allowing the number of H-1B visas to respond flexibly to market forces.

"CED is to be congratulated for issuing such a comprehensive and objective analysis of a very controversial public-policy issue, and for formulating practical recommendations for changes in employment-based admissions programs," IEEE-USA President Ned Sauthoff said. "Given the credibility and objectivity of the CED, IEEE-USA strongly recommends that the report be used as a basis for bipartisan Congressional efforts – involving business, education, government, labor and professional organizations – to legislate needed reforms in America’s employment-based immigration system."

For a full copy of the CED report, visit www.ced.org.

 

IEEE-USA/AAES Seeks $10 Billion for Support of
Department of Defense Science and Technology Program
 
WASHINGTON (28 March 2001) - Dr. Allan C. Schell, a member of IEEE-USA's
Research and Development Policy Committee, Wednesday asked the House
Appropriations Subcommittee on Defense to provide funding of at least $10
billion for the Department of Defense Science and Technology Program
(accounts 6.1 - 6.3) for Fiscal Year 2002.
 
Schell, who spoke on behalf of the American Association of Engineering
Societies (AAES), asked the subcommittee to fund the DoD S&T Program
accounts for basic research (6.1), applied research (6.2) and advanced
technology development (6.3). The funds not only help the United States to
promote and maintain its technological superiority on the battlefield, they
have a major impact on the nation's intellectual infrastructure, Schell
testified.
 
The S&T Program supports a major share of university research, including
65 percent of total federal investment in electrical engineering and 66
percent of total federal investment in mechanical engineering.
 
"The ability of tomorrow's soldiers, sailors, airmen and marines to meet
the challenges of an increasingly sophisticated battle space will depend in
large measure on the vision of Congress and the Administration," Schell
said. "To address those challenges, we must be prepared to invest in science
and technology today."
 
The DoD's S&T Program supports the fundamental research, development and
demonstrations in sciences and technologies identified as important to
military capabilities and operations. This includes the development of the
nation's high-tech weapons systems and the technology base upon which they
rely.
 
The AAES is a multidisciplinary organization dedicated to advancing the
knowledge, understanding, and practice of engineering in the public
interest. Its members represent the mainstream of U.S. engineering-affecting
over 1 million engineers in industry, government and education. For more
information, go to http://www.aaes.org.
 
 
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Top of Page
IEEE-USA is an organizational unit of the IEEE created in 1973 to
promote the careers and public-policy interests of the more than 230,000
electrical, electronics, computer and software engineers who are U.S.
members of the IEEE. The IEEE is the world's largest technical professional
society with over 360,000 members in 150 countries. For more information,
visit us online at http://www.ieeeusa.org.
  
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IEEE-USA
1828 L Street, NW, Suite 1202
Washington, DC 20036-5104
Tel: +1 202 785 0017
Fax: +1 202 785 0835
Web: http://www.ieeeusa.org
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Top of Page
  
Updated 04/01/2001