IEEE USA News
 IEEE-USA
1828 L Street, NW, Suite 1202 - Washington, DC 20036-5104
Tel: +1 202 785 0017 - Fax: +1 202 785 0835
Web: http://www.ieeeusa.org
 
Greg Hill, Member & Electronic Communications Coordinator
g.hill@ieee.org, 202-785-0017, ext. 8335 www.ieeeusa.org
 
===============================================================================
CONTENTS
- Salaries of U.S. IEEE Members Reach Record Levels
- IEEE-USA LEGISLATIVE ACTION ALERT
- A NEW ISSUE OF 'IEEE-USA POLICY PERSPECTIVES' IS LIVE!
- MAY - JUNE 2001 EDITIONS OF IEEE-USA WEBZINES ARE LIVE!
- IEEE Fellow Receives AAES National Engineering Award
- IEEE-USA Recommends Ways to Address National Energy Needs
- PENSION REFORM PROVISIONS SURVIVE LAST-MINUTE TAX BILL NEGOTIATIONS
- Connecticut teenager wins $10,000 IEEE Presidents' Scholarship
- MEET IEEE-USA'S 2001 WISE INTERNS
- BLACKOUT: FRONTLINE LOOKS AT THE CALIFORNIA POWER CRISIS
 
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Top of Page
 

Salaries of U.S. IEEE Members Reach Record Levels
WASHINGTON (8 May 2001) - The IEEE-USA Salary and Fringe Benefit Survey,
2001 Edition will be encouraging reading to U.S. IEEE members -- showing
substantial gains in the salaries of our members. The number of respondents
nearly doubled to more than 9,700, largely because the survey was conducted
online for the first time. The increase in the database volume will make the
survey the biggest and most accurate of the 15 studies of member
compensation that IEEE-USA has conducted. The survey will be released in
June.
The 2001 survey will show major gains in the value of professional
services in electrical, electronics and computer engineering. The previous
survey, conducted in 1999, reported the largest increase ever in the real
incomes of U.S. IEEE members when measured in constant dollars. The 2001
edition shows substantial further gains; clearly, employers are placing
increasing value on the services of EEs.
The median value of base pay for members working full time in their area
of professional competence has risen by 6.5 percent since 1999. Coupled with
the gains reported in 1999, our members have seen their purchasing power
increase by more than 18 percent over the last four years. These gains are
for all members as a group. Most individuals will have done much better
because they have also received annual raises reflecting their increased
experience.
As of January 2001, the median primary income -- which includes base
pay, commissions and bonuses, and any net income from self-employment -- of
U.S. IEEE members working full time in their primary area of technical
competence was $93,100. Two years ago the figure was $82,000. The gains look
even better if income from all sources is counted, adding in earnings from
second jobs, payments for overtime, pension benefits and the like. This
pushes the median incomes of engineers working full time in their
specialties up to $99,000 in 2001, compared to $87,200 in 1999. Both gains
represent increases of 13.5 percent in absolute (not constant) dollars.
In addition to these types of compensation, more than a third of U.S.
IEEE members in the workforce received stock options in 2000. Although the
share receiving stock options has increased from 27.5 percent in 1997, the
typical estimated worth of the options was much lower, to a median estimated
value of $5,000. This is half the size of the figure reported in 1999.
The failure of the dot-com investment craze has affected the
option-compensation picture, and fully a third of all those receiving
options in 2000 assessed them as worthless by early 2001. At the same time,
some members received very large compensation in the form of options,
including awards valued at $1 million or more. Hence, the 2001 survey
reveals both the risks and the potential rewards of stock options as a
component of overall compensation.
IEEE-USA's 2001 salary and fringe benefits survey benefited immensely
from a change in data collection. In the past, members were asked to fill
out paper questionnaires. This time, they responded to questions on an
Internet site. The shift to online data collection significantly lowered the
cost of the survey. And the greater number of respondents means that details
not reported in the past will be found this year.
So why should you order a copy of the survey? Simply put, it is the only
real source for timely, vital information that you must have to assess your
market value as an engineer. It is clearly the definitive salary and
reference guide for technical professionals.
In addition to the survey, an online salary calculator will be available
for a nominal cost through the IEEE-USA Web site www.ieeeusa.org. This
personal salary estimator replaces Salary Benchmarks: A Personal Workbook,
and will make it easier than ever to make sure you're getting paid what you'
re worth.
The IEEE-USA Salary & Fringe Benefit Survey, 2001 Edition, which will be
available in June from the IEEE's Service Center in Piscataway, N.J., can be
ordered now by IEEE members for the special pre-publication price of
US$64.95. The regular member price is US$74.95. This is half off the
US$149.95 price for non-IEEE members. To order, call +1 800 678 IEEE (4333)
and ask for product number UH-2990.
 
 
IEEE-USA LEGISLATIVE ACTION ALERT
 
Dear IEEE-USA Volunteer,
 
I'm afraid that many of us have been lulled into believing that enactment
of the Retirement Security and Pension Reform Act (that passed the House
last week by a vote of 407 to 24) is a sure thing this year. Not!
 
Just like last year, the bill could end up on the cutting room floor in the
Senate - unless Senate Finance Committee members and Members of the U.S.
Senate hear from their constituents.
 
As many of you know, Finance Committee Chair Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) is
trying to cobble together a reconciliation tax cut proposal that will
gradually reduce the top income tax rate to 36 percent (instead of 33
percent as President Bush and the House are urging); repeal the estate tax
but not the gift tax; and provide pension reform and educational tax
relief. He hopes to be able to reach agreement later this week or early
next week and take the package to the Finance Committee for mark up on
Tuesday or Wednesday. A floor vote on the tax package is expected the
following week.
 
Reportedly, Grassley was told in no uncertain terms by some Republican
Committee members (at a closed door meeting yesterday) to make the rate cut
component stronger - at the expense of other provisions that Grassley wants
to include in the bill. More specifically, Grassley was told to dump the
$40 billion IRA expansion/pension reform proposal, the $70 billion
alternative minimum tax relief provisions and relief from the marriage
penalty in order to speed up the rate cut.
 
In order to prevent this from happening, it is very important that each of
you call your United States Senators in Washington (Senate switchboard
number is 202/224-3121) as soon as possible.
 
Identify yourself as a constituent and tell the Senator not to dump the
pension provisions from the Senate Finance Committee tax package! It's okay
to ask for the Senator's tax staffer or, alternatively, to leave a message.
 
Calls to Senate Finance Committee Republicans will be most helpful, but
asking Democrats to urge inclusion of the pension package in the
reconciliation tax relief proposal should help to facilitate a bipartisan
vote when the full committee takes up the bill next week.
 
Here are pertinent names and telephone numbers for Finance Committee
members:
 
Senators Tax Aide Telephone
 
Charles Grassley (R-Iowa)# Kolan Davis 202/224-4515
Orrin Hatch (R-Utah)# Evan Liddiard 202/224-0619
Frank Murkowski (R-Ark.)# Alex Polinsky 202/224-6665
Don Nickles (R-Okla.) Hazen Marshall 202/224-5754
Phil Gramm (R-Texas) Dick Ribbentrop 202/224-2934
Trent Lott (R-Miss.) Keith Hennessey 202/224-3135
Jim Jeffords (R-Vt.)# Jeff Fox 202/224-5141
Fred Thompson (R-Tenn.) Rachel Jones 202/224-4944
Olympia Snowe (R-Maine) Tom Geier 202/224-5344
Jon Kyl (R-Ariz.)# Tim Glazewski 202/224-4521
 
Max Baucus (D-Mont.)# Pat Heck 202/224-2651
John D. Rockefeller (D-W.Va.) Ellen Doneski 202/224-6472
Tom Daschle (D-S.D.) Chuck Marr 202/224-2321
John Breaux (D-La.) # Rebecca Hawes 202/224-4623
Kent Conrad (D-N.D.) Steve Bailey 202/224-2043
Bob Graham (D-Fla.) # Bob Greenawalt 202/224-3041
Jeff Bingaman (D-N.M.) Jim Dennis 202/224-5521
John Kerry (D-Mass.) # Michael Leighs 202/224-2742
Robert Torricelli (D-N.J.) Mike Szymanski 202/224-3224
Blance Lincoln (D-Neb.) # Mac Campbell 202/224-4843
 
Senators marked with a # are cosponsors of the Retirement Security and
Savings Act (S. 742)
 
Please send questions and feedback regarding your calls to my attention.
 
Thanks for your help!
 
Vin O'Neill
Senior Legislative Representative
IEEE-USA
 
A NEW ISSUE OF 'IEEE-USA POLICY PERSPECTIVES' IS LIVE!
 
The May - June 2001 edition of 'IEEE-USA POLICY PERSPECTIVES' is available
now on the Web. POLICY PERSPECTIVES is IEEE-USA's monthly, policy-oriented
webzine, offering articles and commentary on the topics that are shaping
legislation, the technology workplace, and the engineering world. This
edition includes:
 
* Internet Privacy and the 107th Congress
* Shaping Public Policy: Show You CARE About Policy Issues
* Action Alerts: IEEE-USA Needs Your Support!
- Action Needed Now to Preserve Pension/IRA Reforms in Senate Tax Bill
- IEEE-USA Endorses Small Business Fairness Act
* Reader Poll: Does Internet Privacy Really Exist?
* Capitol Shavings: Federal Government Appointments
* IEEE-USA Council Corner
 
To read POLICY PERSPECTIVES, visit:
<http://www.todaysengineer.org/policyperspectives/index.html>
 
Spread the word about the new IEEE-USA webzines! If you haven't already,
visit IEEE-USA TODAY'S ENGINEER at:
<http://www.todaysengineer.org/careerfocus/index.html>
 
************************************************
Contact: Greg Hill, g.hill@ieee.org
Member & Electronic Communications Coordinator
+1 202 785 0017, ext. 8335
http://www.ieeeusa.org
IEEE-USA webzines http://www.todaysengineer.org
 
********************************************
 
MAY - JUNE 2001 EDITIONS OF IEEE-USA WEBZINES ARE LIVE!
 
The May - June 2001 editions of 'IEEE-USA TODAY'S ENGINEER' and 'IEEE-USA
POLICY PERSPECTIVES' are available now on the Web.
 
TODAY'S ENGINEER is IEEE-USA's monthly, career-oriented webzine, offering
feature articles and short blurbs with career guidance, tips, strategies
and solutions for all sectors of the profession. This month's fare
includes:
 
* 2001 Salary Survey: EE Salaries Hit Record High
* Your Career Path: Jumping Onto the Fast Track
* Engineering Trends: Making the Most of Being Laid Off
* Engineering Hall of Fame: Emile Berliner and the Making of "Ma Bell"
* World Bytes: Careers & Summits
* Capers: Career Day
* Reader Poll: Is the Cost of Engineering Getting Out of Hand?
 
To read Today's Engineer, visit:
<http://www.todaysengineer.org/careerfocus/index.html>
 
POLICY PERSPECTIVES is IEEE-USA's monthly, policy-oriented webzine,
offering articles and commentary on the topics that are shaping
legislation, the technology workplace, and the engineering world. This
edition includes:
 
* Internet Privacy and the 107th Congress
* Shaping Public Policy: Show You CARE About Policy Issues
* Action Alerts: IEEE-USA Needs Your Support!
- Action Needed Now to Preserve Pension/IRA Reforms in Senate Tax Bill
- IEEE-USA Endorses Small Business Fairness Act
* Reader Poll: Does Internet Privacy Really Exist?
* Capitol Shavings: Federal Government Appointments
* IEEE-USA Council Corner
 
To read POLICY PERSPECTIVES, visit:
<http://www.todaysengineer.org/policyperspectives/index.html>
 
Spread the word about the new IEEE-USA webzines and don't forget to sign up
to receive e-mail updates when new editions of the webzines go online!
 
 
IEEE Fellow Receives AAES National Engineering Award
 
WASHINGTON (17 May 2001) - IEEE Fellow Edmund O. Schweitzer III received
the National Engineering Award at the American Association of Engineering
Societies' Awards Ceremony and Banquet at the Rayburn House Office Building
on Capitol Hill on 7 May.
 
IEEE Executive Director Dan Senese made the presentation on behalf of
the engineering profession to recognize an engineer who has made outstanding
contributions to our nation.
 
In over 20 years of service in industry and academia, Schweitzer has
accrued more than 30 patents, conducted important research and contributed
to over 60 technical papers in the field of electric power engineering.
Through his research and inventions, he was able to utilize the
microprocessor in the electric power industry to monitor equipment and
outages. His inventions allow power outages to be located in a timelier
manner, thus protecting people against loss of fresh water supplies and loss
of refrigeration for food and medicine.
 
Schweitzer, recognized as a pioneer in digital protection, founded
Schweitzer Engineering Laboratories (SEL) in Pullman, Wash., in 1982 to
develop and manufacture digital protective relays and related products and
services. SEL's fundamental purpose is to make electric power safer, more
reliable and more economical. Today, SEL is an employee-owned company which
serves the electric power industry worldwide. Its equipment protects
feeders, motors, transformers, transmission lines and other power apparatus.
The company employs 550 people and has 24 domestic and 10 international
locations.
 
The IEEE Board of Directors confers the grade of Fellow upon a person
with an extraordinary record of accomplishments in any of the IEEE fields of
interest. The title is bestowed upon less than one percent of IEEE members.
 
Later at the ceremony, IEEE-USA President Ned Sauthoff presented
Jonathan Knight of New Scientist magazine with the Engineering Journalism
Award for his November 2000 article "Art of Glass." The award was
established by the United Engineering Foundation to recognize outstanding
reporting of an event or issue that furthers the public understanding of
engineering.
 
IEEE-USA is an organizational unit of the IEEE created in 1973 to
promote the careers and public-policy interests of the more than 230,000
electrical, electronics, computer and software engineers who are U.S.
members of the IEEE. The IEEE is the world's largest technical professional
society. Through its members, the IEEE is a leading authority on areas
ranging from aerospace, computers and telecommunications to biomedicine,
electric power and consumer electronics. For more information, visit us
online at http://www.ieeeusa.org.

 

IEEE-USA Recommends Ways to Address National Energy Needs

 
WASHINGTON (25 May 2001) - IEEE-USA is calling for a balanced energy
portfolio, more emphasis on the reliability of the electrical utility system
and the technical involvement of engineers in addressing our nation's energy
needs, in a public statement issued earlier this week and delivered to
Capitol Hill.
 
In the statement, IEEE-USA recommends that, "Congress and the Bush
Administration should enact legislation creating an impartial, self-managing
electric reliability organization with the authority to develop new national
reliability rules and practices that all organizations and companies
participating in the electric power marketplace must meet."
 
IEEE members are ready to provide technical expertise to President
George W. Bush and members of Congress on these important issues. The
statement follows.
 
For more on IEEE-USA's public-policy positions, go to
http://www.ieeeusa.org/forum/.
 
IEEE-USA is an organizational unit of the IEEE created in 1973 to
promote the careers and public-policy interests of the more than 230,000
electrical, electronics, computer and software engineers who are U.S.
members of the IEEE. The IEEE is the world's largest technical professional
society. Through its members, the IEEE is a leading authority on areas
ranging from aerospace, computers and telecommunications to biomedicine,
electric power and consumer electronics. For more information, visit us
online at http://www.ieeeusa.org.
 
 
IEEE-USA Public Statement on Efforts
to Address National Energy Needs
 
WASHINGTON (23 May 2001) - As the current situation in California so
clearly illustrates, the United States needs a comprehensive national energy
policy designed to ensure an adequate, reliable, economical and
environmentally acceptable supply of energy, particularly electrical energy,
to meet both current and future energy challenges. Our electric power
systems must be planned, designed and operated based upon sound engineering
principles, and must be based on sound analyses of future needs.
 
"It is critical not to take our national energy supply or our electric
power system for granted," IEEE-USA President Ned Sauthoff said. "We must
make the investments and adopt the policies needed today to ensure reliable
and affordable electric power is available in the future."
 
For these reasons, IEEE-USA applauds the efforts of President George W.
Bush and members of both parties in Congress to create a national consensus
on energy policy. IEEE-USA believes strongly that a comprehensive national
energy strategy should support a broad and balanced range of electric
generation and conservation options, and that our nation must invest in new
technologies needed to satisfy future energy demand. This means policies
that promote energy efficiency, cleaner conversion fossil fuels,
commercialization of renewable energy resources, nuclear power and advanced
technologies such as fusion and hydrogen, for the future.
 
The deregulation of the electric utility industry has posed fundamental
challenges to the reliability of the electric power system. The marketplace,
ideally, will encourage the development of new, efficient generation.
However, the capacity, control and operation of the transmission system are
inadequate for supporting a fully competitive market. Developing better ways
to operate transmission systems is the major technological challenge of
restructuring. New and improved transmission, communication, control, and
metering technologies and systems need to be developed for the new structure
of the electrical system to succeed.
 
Congress and the Bush Administration should enact legislation creating
an impartial, self-managing electric reliability organization with the
authority to develop new national reliability rules and practices that all
organizations and companies participating in the electric power marketplace
must meet. The Administration should also immediately sponsor a substantial
program to assess recent experience in the functioning of electric power
markets and analyze the effect of various market designs on the cost of
electricity and system reliability.
 
Sound energy policy requires more than a political balancing of popular
interests. Because of the technological complexity of our national energy
system, policy must also be consistent with sound technical and economic
analyses prepared by professionals who are fully qualified in their
respective disciplines. IEEE members stand ready to provide our technical
expertise as a resource to assist the President and Congress in this
important task.
 
Staff Contact: Bill Williams
Legislative Representative, Technology Policy Activities
Phone: + 1 202 785 0017, ext. 8331
E-Mail: billwilliams@ieee.org

 

PENSION REFORM PROVISIONS SURVIVE LAST-MINUTE TAX BILL NEGOTIATIONS
House and Senate negotiators worked hard last week to assemble a workable
tax bill to put before Congress prior to its week-long Memorial Day recess.
Shortly after noon on Saturday, the Senate approved the compromise bill,
the Economic Growth and Tax Relief Reconciliation Act (H.R.1836) on a
roll-call vote (53 to 33 -- with 9 Senators not voting). The House approved
the same bill hours earlier by a vote of 240 to 154 -- with 39
Representatives not voting. Included in the final agreement were important
IRA expansion and pension reform provisions supported by IEEE-USA and other
engineering societies. As passed by the Congress, the bill:
 
1) Expands contribution limits for traditional and Roth IRAs from the
current $2,000 a year to: $3,000 in 2002 through 2004; $4,000 in 2005 to
2007; and $5,000 in 2008
 
2) Authorizes additional "catch-up" contributions to traditional and Roth
IRAs for individuals 50 and above by $500 in 2002 and by $1,000 in 2006
 
3) Increases allowable contribution limits to 401(k), 403(b) and Section
457 state and local government plans from the current $10,500 to: $11,000
in 2002; $12,000 in 2003; $13,000 in 2004; $14,000 in 2005; and $15,000 in
2006
 
4) Increases allowable contributions to SIMPLE plans from the current
$6,000 to: $7,000 in 2002; $8,000 in 2003; $9,000 in 2004; and $10,000 in
2005
 
5) Authorizes additional catch-up contributions to all plans other than
Savings Incentive Match for Employees (SIMPLE) plans by: $1,000 in 2002;
$2,000 in 2003; $3,000 in 2004: $4,000 in 2005; and $5,000 in 2006. SIMPLE
plan catch-ups will be 50 percent of catch-ups applicable to other plans
 
6) Establishes a non-refundable income tax credit for elective
contributions by certain low income individuals to IRAs and qualified plans
(sunsets at the end of 2006)
 
7) Establishes a tax credit for new retirement plan expenses incurred by
small businesses (100 or fewer employees) for the first three years of the
plan
 
8) Reduces cliff vesting requirements for employer matching contributions
to defined contribution plans from the current 5 to 3 years
 
9) Improves portability by facilitating rollovers to and from qualified
retirement plans, 403(b) tax-deferred annuities; Section 457 plans and IRAs
 
10) Strengthens notification requirements for plan amendments that will
result in a significant reduction in future plan benefit accruals
 
Efforts in the House to preserve the President's desired reduction of the
top marginal income tax rate from 39.6 percent to 33 percent had put at
risk a number of Senate-backed provisions -- including pension reform. As
legislators and lobbyists converged on Capitol Hill late last week to rally
their forces, there was little anyone could do but wait and see what would
emerge in the House-Senate compromise. In the end, pension reform
provisions were left largely intact due to their relatively low cost and
their broad bipartisan support in both houses of Congress.
 
When ratified by the President, the compromise will reduce incrementally
the top rate to 35 percent beginning in 2006. The plan is expected to cost
an estimated $1.35 trillion over 10 years. The total estimated cost of the
IRA expansion and pension reform provisions in the conference agreement
will be $21.6 billion over 5 years and $49.6 billion over 10 years. All of
the provisions of the tax bill are set to expire in 2010.
 
Also included in tax plan -- of interest to IEEE-USA -- were educational
provisions that will: raise allowable contribution limits to educational
savings accounts to $2,000; extend the $5,250 income tax exclusion for
employer provided educational assistance for graduate and undergraduate
level courses; increase income eligibility phase-out ranges for the
deductability of interest on student loans; and establish an above-the-line
deduction for qualified higher education expenses in 2002 through 2005.

 

 Connecticut teenager wins $10,000 IEEE Presidents' Scholarship
 
By Lynn Murison, IEEE EAB Outreach Administrator
 
Mariangela Lisanti has won the $10,000 IEEE Presidents' Scholarship with
her project "Conductance Quantization in Au Nanocontacts." The 17 year old
senior from Staples High School, Westport, Conn., USA was presented with
the IEEE Foundation supported award on 10 May at the annual Intel
International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF) held this year in San
Jose, CA.
 
"I predict that she will be heard from in the future, and the fact that
IEEE helped make it possible for her to become a success is to our credit,"
said IEEE past President Bruce Eisenstein who traveled to San Jose to
present the award. "That's what an awards program is about: Honor those who
deserve it, so that they can do even more and so further honor the
presenter."
 
"There are a lot of tough times when you're doing research and you have to
be lucky," said Lisanti, "but my motto is: the more hard work you put in
will increase the probability that you'll be lucky."
 
Lisanti developed a novel technique for measuring conductance quantization
in metallic nanowires, using gold as its conductor. It is both faster and
less expensive than the three devices commonly used, aiding in the
continuing quest for the miniaturization of electronic devices.
 
The Scholarship is the only Institute-wide scholarship awarded to a
pre-college student. An audience of over 3,000 at the awards ceremony
"ooohed" when the amount of the Scholarship was announced. It is the
largest special award given by an organization at Intel ISEF. The
Scholarship is awarded for "outstanding achievement in creating a project
that demonstrates an understanding of electrical engineering, information
technology, or other IEEE fields of interest."
 
IEEE Lead judge Keith Gudger, Santa Clara Valley Section, fielded a team of
14 judges, including Rachel Wilson, who will serve as Lead Judge for the
2002 IEEE Presidents' Scholarship. The team was dispatched to sort through
the 1230 projects and to progressively narrow down the finalists. On 9 May,
the judges started work at 8:00 a.m., and were diligent even to being
sequestered from the prying public, until well after dinner. They were also
tasked with judging the 11 individual awards contributed by a coalition of
Region 6 sections.
 
Finalists hailed from 43 countries, Argentina through Venezuela, Native
American Indian lands, and 47 of the United States. For a full,
alphabetical listing of the winning projects, see
http://www.sciserv.org/isef/sao2001.asp; check out the informal pictures of
the judges and the winners at http://www.sploids.com/isef2001/isefpix.html.
 
Lynn Murison
Outreach Administrator, IEEE Educational Activities
ph: 1.732.562.6526
www.ieee.org/organizations/eab/
 
MEET IEEE-USA'S 2001 WISE INTERNS
 
Another group of enthusiastic students arrived in Washington this week to
begin their summer in the Washington Internships for Students of
Engineering (WISE) program. Each summer, WISE brings 14-16 outstanding
engineering students from around the country to Washington, DC, for 10
weeks to learn how engineers influence public policy decisions on complex
technological issues. As a part of their experience, each student prepares
and presents a paper on a current and topical engineering-related public
policy issue. All WISE Interns are sponsored by one of several engineering
societies that participate in the WISE program. This year, IEEE is
sponsoring three electrical engineering students, marking the tenth
consecutive year that IEEE has participated in the program. Working in and
out of IEEE-USA's Washington office this summer are:
 
- Matthew Bright, a junior at the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor
majoring in electrical engineering. Matt hopes to evaluate federal
policies and programs designed to help bridge the "Digital Divide" in
Internet Services.
 
- Rick Cordaro, a third-year student in a 5-year program at the Iowa State
University majoring in electrical engineering. Rick is interested in U.S.
energy policy and issues related to the reliability of the U.S. electric
supply.
 
- Brent Rowe, a junior at North Carolina State University with a double
major in electrical engineering and economics. Brent plans to research the
U.S. government's role in developing a national fiber optic network.
 
IEEE-USA is also pleased to announce that IEEE-USA R&D Policy Committee
Vice Chair Ron Hira is the Faculty-Member-in-Residence (FMR) for the 15
students participating in this year's WISE program. For more information on
the WISE program, visit:
<http://www.wise-intern.org/>
 
 
BLACKOUT: FRONTLINE LOOKS AT THE CALIFORNIA POWER CRISIS
 
Tune in next Tuesday, 5 June (10:00 p.m. EDT) for "Blackout," an hour-long
PBS investigation into the energy woes that have plunged the nation's most
populous state into sporadic darkness. With a number of other states
gearing up to deregulate their electric utility industries, will they face
a similar fate? IEEE Life Fellow and past chair of the IEEE-USA Energy
Policy Committee Jack Casazza was interviewed for the program. For more
information, visit:
<http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/programs/>
 
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Top of Page
IEEE-USA is an organizational unit of the IEEE created in 1973 to
promote the careers and public-policy interests of the more than 230,000
electrical, electronics, computer and software engineers who are U.S.
members of the IEEE. The IEEE is the world's largest technical professional
society with over 360,000 members in 150 countries. For more information,
visit us online at http://www.ieeeusa.org.
  
***********************
IEEE-USA
1828 L Street, NW, Suite 1202
Washington, DC 20036-5104
Tel: +1 202 785 0017
Fax: +1 202 785 0835
Web: http://www.ieeeusa.org
*********************** 
Top of Page
  
Updated 05/31/2001