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Orlando Section Monthly
SCOOP, December 2002
Published for IEEE Section Chairs
Vicki Waldman, Editor; Tracy Hawkins, Manager Section/Chapter Support


* Showcase Your Newsletter!
* Section Volunteer Virtual Community
* RAB Industry Relations Contacts Project
* IEEE Fellow Class of 2003
* E-Week 2003 Kits Now Available
* "Accessing IEEE Technical Information" Free Web Conference
* Brain Teaser Solution (October)
 
 
SHOWCASE YOUR NEWSLETTER!
 
IEEE Corporate Communications would like to showcase Section/Region
newsletters, Web sites and other materials in a new IEEE global identity
display. If your Section has already adopted the IEEE Master Brand, please
send newsletters and other samples to Corporate Communications at the
Operations Center address (445 Hoes Lane, Piscataway, NJ 08854) or by email
to corporate-communications@ieee.org. All Sections that haven't yet done so
are encouraged to implement the approved IEEE Master Brand in 2003. Samples
(or Web site URLs) can be submitted throughout the year. Here are some
references to make the change as easy as possible for you.
 
* The IEEE Master Brand Reference Guide (distributed as a card at Sections
Congress) http://www.ieee.org/identitystandards
* Downloadable images -- http://www.ieee.org/masterbrand
* Web Templates for Sections -- http://www.ieee.org/web/developers/design
* IEEE Identity Standards -- http://www.ieee.org/identitystandards
 
For usage questions, contact corporate-communications@ieee.org or
copyrights@ieee.org.
 
 
SECTION VOLUNTEER VIRTUAL COMMUNITY,
SHARE YOUR BEST PRACTICES AND SUCCESSFUL VENTURES
 
With the year nearly over, most Section Chairs now have eleven months, or
more, of experience running a Section, with all of the accompanying good
times and difficulties that the job entails. You can share what you have
learned with incoming officers, not just in your Section, but also around
the world, by signing onto the virtual community established for your use,
the IEEE Section/Chapter Volunteer Forum Virtual Community and adding your
comments. You can access the forum by going to
https://www.ieeecommunities.org/section-chapter_vol (if you have trouble
accessing the page via the link, please cut and paste the URL). Once
there:
1. Click on "Join".
2. Choose "Option A: Create a new account".
3. Complete all fields marked with a red asterisk.
4. Read the Terms of Service and check the box to indicate agreement.
5. Click the "Join Now" box.
 
The virtual community was rolled out at Sections Congress in October.
There are currently 159 members in the community and the list is expected
to keep growing. In future issues of SCOOP, we will encourage the incoming
2003 Section Chairs to log in and read your comments. Your best practices
and successful ventures will be most welcome. Help our new Chairs face the
challenges of the upcoming year well prepared with your guidance!
 
If you have questions about the IEEE Section-Chapter Volunteer Forum,
contact Denise Maestri at +1 732 562 5505 or d.maestri@ieee.org. For more
information on why IEEE is developing virtual communities or which
communities are currently in development, go to
http://www.ieee.org/organizations/eab/lc/index.htm or
https://www.ieeecommunities.org/. For technical support, send an email to
ieeecommunities@ieee.org.
 
 
RAB INDUSTRY RELATIONS CONTACTS PROJECT
 
In early November 2002, the RAB Industry Relations Committee (IRC) asked
for your help in identifying local industry/corporate firms segmented by
IEEE Sections, that you, IEEE Section Chairs, had been in contact with in
support of your Section's activities, or one that you would like to reach
out to for their support. We had a deadline date for responses and offered
$25US to the first response to our request and $25US to the response with
the longest list of industry contacts.
 
On behalf of the RAB IRC Chair Joe Kalasky, we are pleased to announce our
two winners and Congratulations to each!
 
*Cody W. Tews, IEEE Spokane Section with the first response
*Michael A. Miller, IEEE New York Section, with the longest list response
 
Our prizes may have been given away, but if you are working on a list of
industry contacts, please continue working and send it along to us. Send
any additional industry contacts to c.downer@ieee.org.
 
 
IEEE FELLOW CLASS OF 2003
 
The new Fellows report is now available on the web at
http://www.ieee.org/fellows. The links include the necessary information
to contact the new Fellows should you wish to send congratulatory letters
from the Section.
 
If you have any questions, wish to obtain the list by Section, or would
like information for incorporation into recognition speeches, contact
Marybeth Denike, Awards/Fellow Activities at phone: +1 732 562 3842 or
email: m.denike@ieee.org
 
 
E-WEEK 2003 KITS NOW AVAILABLE
 
Planning kits for National Engineers Week 2003 (16-22 February) are now
available from IEEE-USA and the E-Week Website. The kit will guide you on
conducting E-Week activities in your area. It includes 50 ways you can
participate in E-Week, a planning calendar, publicity program, E-Week
poster and a product catalog and order form.
 
The Discover "E" program provides information for engineers who visit
classrooms to help improve student interest in science, technology,
engineering and mathematics. Information is also included on Introduce a
Girl to Engineering Day and the Future City Competition.
 
To request your kit, contact Helen Hall at 202-785-0017, ext. 8354 or
h.hall@ieee.org. You can also get one by visiting
https://shop.eweek.org/eweek/ and clicking "Promotional Materials."
 
 
"ACCESSING IEEE TECHNICAL INFORMATION"
FREE WEB CONFERENCE COMING IN FEBRUARY
 
The IEEE will host a live Web Conference, "Accessing IEEE Technical
Information: The IEEE Member Digital Library" on 11 February 2003 at 7:30am
PST/10:30am EST, from the International Solid-State Circuits Conference in
San Francisco, CA, USA. As Internet attendance is limited, IEEE Sections
and Chapters are encouraged to invite members to central locations to view
the Web Conference to allow as many members to view the presentation as
possible.
 
IEEE members and others interested in viewing the free Web conference can
register at http://www.ieee.org/ieeemdl (cut and paste the URL if the link
does not work).
 
For more information on the Web Conference, please contact Barbara Soifer,
IEEE Sales & Marketing, at b.soifer@ieee.org or IEEE Member Services at
mdlhelp@ieee.org.
 
 
 
BRAIN TEASER CHALLENGE SOLUTION, OCTOBER 2002 Butch Shadwell
 
To my surprise and delight, there were actually a couple of correct answers
submitted to last months BTC. If you recall, dancing Tony was interested
in the response of a nuclear/ionization type smoke detector to the sudden
decompression of a room in space. In order to answer this I must review
the operation of the typical ionization smoke detector. First, the sensor
in one of these units is composed of two chambers with a metal partition
between them. This partition normally has a tiny piece of Americium 241, a
radionuclide, mounted in the center such that the flux of alpha particles
it emits will ionize the air both above and below the metal partition.
Next, the sensor has upper and lower electrodes that are oppositely charged
so inducing a current flow through the ionized air in the sensor. With the
metal partition in the center of this current path, the voltage with
respect to either of the end plates is approximately v/2 under normal
circumstances. One last important feature of this sensor is that one side
of this divided chamber allows for very free airflow while the other does
not. So, when smoke gets into the open side of the chamber, the particles
tend to adsorb or impede the flow of ions causing a higher resistance on
that side of the chamber. This produces a voltage shift at the center
partition that can be measured and thus an alarm is detected.
 
When our spacecraft is decompressed, it would have a similar result in that
most of the ionized air in the open side of the chamber would quickly exit.
Thus, resulting in the same sort of voltage change that the unit would
detect for smoke. So, even though no one may be able to hear it, the alarm
would go off.
 
===================
 
IEEE CONTACT INFORMATION
 
IEEE Operations Center
http://www.ieee.org
445 Hoes Lane
Piscataway NJ 08855-0331
Switchboard: +1 732 981 0060
 
IEEE Regional Activities
http://www.ieee.org/ra
+1 732 562 5501 (voice)
+1 732 463 3657 (fax)
regional.activities@ieee.org
 
The SCOOP
http://www.ieee.org/scoop
+1 732 562 5564 (voice)
+1 732 463 9359 (fax)
scoop@ieee.org
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Updated 12/30/02


 

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