IEEE USA News
 IEEE-USA
1828 L Street, NW, Suite 1202 - Washington, DC 20036-5104
Tel: +1 202 785 0017 - Fax: +1 202 785 0835
Web: http://www.ieeeusa.org
 
Greg Hill, Member & Electronic Communications Coordinator
g.hill@ieee.org, 202-785-0017, ext. 8335 www.ieeeusa.org
 
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CONTENTS
- IEEE COMSOC OFFERS TWO-DVD SET WITH 50 YEARS OF COMMUNICATIONS PAPERS FOR ITS 50TH ANNIVERSARY
- 50% discount on Essential Teaching Seminars
- January - February 2002 EDITIONS OF IEEE-USA WEBZINES ARE LIVE
- IEEE-USA Salary Calculator
- President's Column, February 2002
- IEEE-USA President Speaks on Technological Literacy at SpaceComm 2002
 
 
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IEEE COMSOC OFFERS TWO-DVD SET WITH 50 YEARS OF COMMUNICATIONS PAPERS FOR ITS 50TH ANNIVERSARY
 
Digital Archive Holds 28,000+ Peer-Reviewed Papers by 23,000+ Authors
 
NEW YORK, NY, Jan. 18, 2002 - The IEEE Communications Society is commemorating its 50th anniversary in 2002 by issuing a two-DVD digital archive containing all papers published in six of its magazines and journals during the past half century and from its major conferences since 1999. The set, "Communications Engineering Technology: A Comprehensive Collection of Papers 1953?2001," holds more than 28,000 peer-reviewed papers from more than 23,000 authors.
Copies of the archive go on sale in March at $129 members and $999 for non-members. In addition, anyone who attends an IEEE ComSoc conference in 2002, such as ICC or GLOBECOM, will receive a copy of the DVD set with their full-paid registration.
"Our publications were a major way researchers shared their work as the communications industry exploded in depth and breadth during the past five decades," says Cecilia Desmond, IEEE ComSoc president. "We assembled this archive both as a
historical record of how the field evolved and as a working resource to give researchers and others easy access to essential source materials."
The archive has multiple indexes, a search capability, author profiles, and linked references and citations. For a preview of the range of articles included in it, visit: http://www.comsoc.org/livepubs/dvdweb/index.html. The archive contains PDF versions of papers from the following ComSoc periodicals:
· IEEE Communications Letters from 1997 to 2001
· IEEE Communications Magazine from 1973 to 2001
· IEEE Journal on Selected Areas in Communications from 1983 to 2001
· IEEE Network from 1996 to 2001
· IEEE Personal Communications (now called IEEE Wireless Communications) from 1996 to 2001.
· IEEE Transactions on Communications from 1953 to 2001
Conference papers included in the set are drawn from the following seven ComSoc meeting held between 1999 and 2001:
· Conference on Computer Communications (INFOCOM) from 1999 to 2001
· IEEE Global Telecommunications Conference (GLOBECOM) in 2000 and 2001
· IEEE International Conference on Communications (ICC) in 2000 and 2001
· Integrated Network Management Proceedings (IM) in 1999 and 2000
· Military Communications Conference (MILCOM) from 1999 to 2001
· Network Operations and Management Symposium (NOMS) from 1999 to 2001
· Wireless Communications and Networking Conference (WCNC) from 1999 to 2001
The IEEE Communications Society has almost 60,000 members and is the second largest of IEEE's 36 technical societies. Founded in 1952, it has become the major international forum for the exchange of ideas on communications and information networking.
# # #
To obtain "Communications Engineering Technology: A Comprehensive Collection of Papers 1953?2001," contact: IEEE Operations Center, P.O. Box 459, Piscataway, NJ 08855?0459. To order by phone call (732) 981-0060. (In the U.S. and Canada, IEEE members can call (800) 678-IEEE and non-members (800) 701-IEEE). Orders can also be placed by e-mail at customer?services@ieee.org.
 
 
 
50% discount on Essential Teaching Seminars
 
Learn effective teaching or brush up on your technique.
 
Teaching Seminars for Engineering Faculty is a three-day faculty
development seminar, funded by the United Engineering Foundation and
coordinated by ASME with cooperation from IEEE and AIChE. The Seminar is
particularly useful for early-career faculty and faculty who are non-native
English speakers.
 
You Can Expect To?
 
· Develop an understanding of the basic theory and principles behind
effective teaching and learning styles
 
· Familiarize yourself with writing, speaking and listening skills,
which form the basis for interpersonal bonds with students
 
· Prepare and teach actual classes in a supportive, "learn by doing"
format enabling substantive improvements in your teaching skills.
 
· Utilize teaching assessment techniques to critically evaluate your
videotaped performance
 
IEEE members receive a 50% discount by using their member number. The fee
includes reception and all scheduled meals. Limit 30 participants per
seminar. Register now for only $150 for the April and June seminars.
 
Locations, dates, application requirements and forms are available at
www.asme.org/education/prodev/teach. For further information, contact Nema
Roman, romann@asme.org. 
 
January - February 2002 EDITIONS OF IEEE-USA WEBZINES ARE LIVE
 
The January - February 2002 editions of *IEEE-USA TODAY'S ENGINEER* and
*IEEE-USA POLICY PERSPECTIVES* are available now on the Web.
 
TODAY'S ENGINEER is IEEE-USA's monthly, career-oriented webzine, offering
feature articles and short blurbs with career guidance, tips, strategies
and solutions for all sectors of the profession. This month's edition
includes:
 
+ A-C-T N-O-W CRISIS COMMUNICATION STRATEGY
Disasters can have a lasting effect on a company and its image. As such,
companies need a solid crisis communication strategy. Read the first
installment in a series of articles that detail one such strategy.
 
+ PERSONAL POSITIONING FOR ENGINEERS: THE CHOICES ARE YOURS
+ ENGINEERING TRENDS: NEW YEAR'S RESOLUTION
+ ENGINEERING HALL OF FAME: JOHN V.L. HOGAN
+ WORLDBYTES: PASSAGES
+ OpEd CORNER/READER POLL: WOULD YOU PREFER YOUR ORGANIZATION "FLAT"?
+ IEEE-USA PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE: LET'S MAKE A DIFFERENCE DURING NATIONAL
ENGINEERS WEEK
 
To read TODAY'S ENGINEER, visit:
http://www.todaysengineer.org/careerfocus/
 
 
POLICY PERSPECTIVES is IEEE-USA's monthly, policy-oriented webzine,
offering articles and commentary on the topics that are shaping
legislation, the technology workplace, and the engineering world. In this
month's edition:
 
+ USPTO MOVES AGGRESSIVELY TO BOLSTER STAFF ? DO YOU HAVE A FUTURE IN
PATENTS? You're interested in making a career change, but you want to stay
close to the latest technological innovations. Have you considered becoming
a patent examiner?
 
+ SPECIAL OpEd FEATURE: PROTECTING OUR CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE: A "SILO"
APPROACH WON'T WORK
+ CAPITOL SHAVINGS: ENERGY POLICY AND THE FUTURE OF ANWR
 
To read POLICY PERSPECTIVES, visit:
http://www.todaysengineer.org/policyperspectives/
 
Spread the word about the new IEEE-USA webzines and don't forget to sign up
to receive e-mail updates when new editions of the webzines go online!
 
IEEE-USA Salary Calculator
 
 
Without Engineers The World Stops
By LeEarl Bryant, 2002 IEEE-USA President
President's Column, February 2002
 
The headline for this column is the theme for National Engineers Week
2002 (E-Week 2002) - 17-23 February 2002. E-Week (http://www.eweek.org)
allows U.S. members of IEEE and other supporting organizations to take time
to recognize members of our profession and their accomplishments, and
consider how we can better prepare our young people for tomorrow's
technologies. Hopefully, your IEEE Section and/or Chapter will be
participating in E-Week 2002 activities.
 
The National Society of Professional Engineers (NSPE) established
National Engineers Week in 1951. Presently, a consortium of more than 100
organizations, including IEEE-USA, guides and supports E-Week events.
 
E-Week is celebrated the week we observe George Washington's birthday.
NSPE chose that week to recognize our profession because of our first
president's background as a surveyor and military innovator, and because of
his support for engineering education and the development of technology.
 
The E-Week Website says that: "On June 9, 1778, at Valley Forge, Pa.,
General George Washington issued a call for engineers and engineering
education. This order is considered the genesis of a U.S. Army Engineer
School, which found its permanent home at Fort Belvoir, Va., where
Washington had practiced surveying. As President (1789-97), Washington
pushed for the passage of the first U.S. Patent Act in 1789, and signed the
first official U.S. patent to Samuel Hopkins of Vermont for his process of
making potash and pearl ashes. In 1794, President Washington established a
Corps of Artillerists and Engineers to be educated and stationed at West
Point in New York, which later become the U.S. Military Academy at West
Point." Thus, West Point is considered to be our nation's first engineering
school.
 
From Washington's time to the present, our nation has been blessed with
a select population of creative engineers who have made us the wealthiest
nation in the world and created a lifestyle envied by many. At the same
time, we represent one of the least understood professions, and we'll remain
that way until a larger number of us become active in communicating who we
are and what we do.
 
So I hope you understand why I challenge you to step out of your cubicle
more often to initiate and participate in communicating what you and other
engineers do, and how our contributions make a tremendous difference in
everyday lives. Whether you closely fit the stereotypical "nerd" image or
have an extroverted profile, you can help to create a positive image for
engineers. You can also communicate the need to have an increased level of
comfort with subjects related to science and math. You might even surprise
yourself and enjoy working with teachers and students in pre-college
classrooms.
 
Part of this challenge includes recognizing the work of your peers. Even
though E-Week offers perhaps the best opportunity for recognizing engineers
and their accomplishments, we should make a concerted effort to do this
throughout the year. Most of us know engineers who have made significant
technical breakthroughs, have consistently performed above the average,
mentor others, practice a high degree of professionalism and volunteer for
the benefit of others. In fact, due to the nature of our profession, most
of our members deserve more recognition than they receive.
 
At minimum, take a few moments to pass on words of recognition to your
peers. If possible, submit an award nomination or other acknowledgement of
an engineer's or group of engineers' accomplishments. IEEE-USA sponsors
numerous awards. Go to http://www.ieeeusa.org/AWARDS/index.html for more
information.
 
So make sure you get involved with E-Week activities in your area. You'
ll find it rewarding; the profession and our nation will benefit.
 
 
IEEE-USA President Speaks on Technological Literacy at SpaceComm 2002
 
WASHINGTON (25 February 2002) - IEEE-USA President LeEarl Bryant
appeared at SpaceComm 2002 as a panelist last week in Colorado Springs,
Colo. She discussed precollege education initiatives designed to increase
technical literacy of the general population.
 
The theme of SpaceComm 2002 was "Shaping Information Operations and
Space Leadership." The conference focused on the relevance of current
policy, operations and execution of space and information operations.
 
Bryant spoke on the Education Panel: "Essential Global Technical
Expertise - Investing in our Government and Industry People." Brig. Gen.
David A. Wagie, dean of faculty at the United States Air Force Academy,
chaired the panel.
 
The Rocky Mountain Chapter of the Armed Forces Communications and
Electronics Association hosted SpaceComm 2002, in partnership with the U.S.
Space Command. The AFCEA (www.afcea.org) is a worldwide, non-profit
organization of military and civilian members in the command, control,
communications, computers and intelligence fields.
 
 
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IEEE-USA is an organizational unit of the IEEE created in 1973 to
promote the careers and public-policy interests of the more than 230,000
electrical, electronics, computer and software engineers who are U.S.
members of the IEEE. The IEEE is the world's largest technical professional
society with over 360,000 members in 150 countries. For more information,
visit us online at http://www.ieeeusa.org.
  
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IEEE-USA
1828 L Street, NW, Suite 1202
Washington, DC 20036-5104
Tel: +1 202 785 0017
Fax: +1 202 785 0835
Web: http://www.ieeeusa.org
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Updated 02/28/02