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 IEEE-USA
1828 L Street, NW, Suite 1202 - Washington, DC 20036-5104
Tel: +1 202 785 0017 - Fax: +1 202 785 0835
Web: http://www.ieeeusa.org 
Greg Hill, Member & Electronic Communications Coordinator
g.hill@ieee.org, 202-785-0017, ext. 8335 www.ieeeusa.org
 
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CONTENTS
- Older Engineers Face Longer Unemployment, IEEE-USA Survey Shows
- September Educational Activities E-Digest
- IEEE CAREER ALERT for 25 September 2002
- *IEEE-USA TODAY* September 2002
- President's Column, September 2002
- Canadian company, Omniz Global Knowledge Corporation, has joined the IEEE
Education Partners Program.
- IEEE Student Member Concludes IEEE-USA / AAAS Media Fellowship
- Link for Arthur Winston as IEEE President-Elect 
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Older Engineers Face Longer Unemployment, IEEE-USA Survey Shows
 
WASHINGTON (27 September 2002) - Older electrical and electronics
engineers are out of work longer than their younger peers and cite age as a
barrier to re-employment, the 2002 IEEE-USA Unemployment Survey reveals.
 
For each additional year of age, unemployment duration increases 1.3
weeks. But using three variations of multiple regression estimates and
seven control variables, the impact of age was more dramatic. In this case,
for each additional year, joblessness rises by three weeks.
 
Additionally, those reporting age as a barrier to reentering the
workforce face longer lengths of unemployment (55 weeks) than those who do
not (30 weeks).
 
Dr. Laura Langbein, a professor of public affairs at The American
University in Washington, D.C., analyzed and reported the results. The
entire report is available at
http://www.ieeeusa.org/careers/survey/2002results.pdf.
 
"Overall, age appears to have a persistent effect on the duration of
unemployment," Langbein wrote, "but it cannot be determined from these
surveys whether that is attributable to productive differences, price
differences, the supply of engineers, age discrimination, or some other
factor."
 
The survey, which IEEE-USA has conducted four times, the last in 1998,
was mailed to the 2,955 U.S. IEEE members who reported being unemployed at
some time during the 2001-02 membership year. The responses totaled 758
responses, or 26 percent.
 
The survey also revealed that each additional year of experience helps
to reduce unemployment by two weeks. For example, when comparing two
engineers of the same age (say 55), one with 30 years experience vs. one
with 25, the engineer with more experience has 10 fewer weeks of
joblessness. When comparing two engineers, one 55 and one 60, both with 30
years experience, the older engineer can expect to endure 15 more weeks of
unemployment than his younger peer. Both examples assume that the engineers
are comparable in all other respects, including education.
 
 
September Educational Activities E-Digest
1. IEEE EAB Section Professional Development Award Debuts
The IEEE Educational Activities Board (EAB) has inaugurated a new award
exclusively for Sections and GOLD Affinity Groups. The IEEE EAB Section
Professional Development Award was designated to recognize the major
contributions that Sections make to their members in the areas of lifelong
learning, continuing education, and professional development.
 
It joins the IEEE EAB Employer Professional Development Award in honoring
an organization or institution, rather than an individual.
 
2003 EAB Awards nominations packages are being developed now for the new
and following awards:
 
IEEE EAB Meritorious Achievement Award in Accreditation Activities
IEEE EAB Meritorious Achievement Award in Continuing Education
IEEE EAB Major Educational Innovation Award
IEEE EAB Pre-College Educator Award
IEEE EAB Meritorious Service Citation
IEEE EAB Employer Professional Development Award
 
Please check the awards pages starting at www.ieee.org/eab/awards for full
descriptions of the awards plus honorarium details, if applicable. For more
information contact Rae Toscano by e-mail, r.toscano@ieee.org
 
2. $30,000 NSF grant for an online Reference Guide on Power and Energy
A $30,000 National Science Foundation grant has been awarded to IEEE
Educational Activities as seed money for an introductory online Reference
Guide on Power and Energy. The new Guide will be developed by the IEEE
Virtual Community on Power and Energy and be posted at its website,
www.ieee.org/virtualcommunities/power.htm. It will be suitable for both a
non-technical and technical audience, providing information, research, and
curricula in the power and energy fields.
 
Initially focusing on the non-technical audience, the Guide will stress the
interdisciplinary nature of power and energy. Information on how the fields
interact with law, economics, and other fields of engineering will be
included. Additionally, it will enumerate a set of learning objectives
indicating what the technologically literate person should know about these
fields.
 
The Project Team designing the Guide will be drawn from the present members
of the IEEE Virtual Community, and will work with volunteers through IEEE
Technical Societies, including Power Engineering, Industry Application,
Industrial Electronics, Communications, Computing, and Neural Networks. It
will draw from both university and non-university sources for
contributions.
 
The pilot of IEEE Virtual Community on Power and Energy was introduced
Spring 2002. Hallmarks of the service are the ability for members to
consult world-wide with colleagues and receiving current and cutting edge
information in their fields.
 
For more information on the project or on the IEEE Virtual Community on
Power and Energy, contact Jill Bagley, Educational Activities New Products
Manager, j.bagley@ieee.org.
 
3. "Deans Summit II: Fostering Campus Collaborations" 9-12 January 2003
The IEEE Educational Activities Board (EAB) presents the "Deans Summit II:
Fostering Campus Collaborations." A follow up to the successful 2001 EAB
Conference: "Taking the Lead: Deans Summit on Education for a
Technological World," Fostering Campus Collaborations will be held on 9-12
January 2003 in Miami, Florida, USA at the Biscayne Bay Marriott Hotel &
Marina. The three day conference will combine parallel sessions with break
out groups on three basic tracks: teacher preparation, community outreach
to pre-college and undergraduate levels, and pedagogical approaches for
engineering education.
 
Deans of Education and Engineering are logical partners to address the
level of understanding of science, technology, engineering and mathematics.
The growing complexity and influence of technology has made learning the
fundamentals of engineering an urgent public matter.
 
Fostering Campus Collaborations is open to any college-level teacher
preparation or engineering educator, of any field, who wants to contribute
their best practices or learn more about collaborations to further
technological literacy. Sessions will demonstrate and initiate discussions
on the benefits of pedagogical collaborations; engineering standards in
pre-college curricula; potential funding sources and effective program
implementation strategies.
 
Registration, submission guidelines and requirements for presentations, and
applications are online at www.ieee.org/eab/fcc. Register before 15 October
2002 to receive the Conference discount. For more information, contact
Douglas Gorham, Ed.D, Educational Activities Pre-College Education Manager,
at phone +1 941 753 4758 or d.g.gorham@ieee.org.
 
 
4. Canadian company, Omniz Global Knowledge Corporation, joins the IEEE Education Partners Program
Available at a 10% discount to IEEE members are six technical courses,
referred to as multimedia books, which are presented in a combination of
CDROM and print. All six courses were developed by IEEE members Drs Michel
Nakhla and Ram Achar, who are faculty in Electrical Engineering at Carleton
University.
 
The current course list centers on signal integrity, with difficulty levels
ranging from introductory to highly technical. The multimedia books cover
such topics as macromodeling, principles of SPICE based simulation,
transient analysis, and Krylov-Subspace Techniques. Each comes with exams
to measure learning. The exams are graded and solutions are provided. The
CD ROM format allows students to proceed at their own pace.
 
IEEE Fellow, Professor Nakhla, is one of the leading researchers in the
world in the area of high-speed interconnect analysis. IEEE member Dr.
Achar has received awards on his work on high-speed circuit and
interconnect analysis, including the highly regarded Natural Science &
Engineering Research Council doctoral award. They have both been published
widely.
 
To receive the member discount and to read the course syllabi, go to
www.ieee.org/EduPartners, look under corporate partners. For further
information on this program, contact Sasha Eydlin, s.eydlin@ieee.org.
 
5. Drexel University joins IEEE Education Partners Program
Drexel University, Philadelphia's technological university, has become the
newest IEEE Education Partner. IEEE members can now continue their life
long learning with selected graduate-level, credit courses provided online
by Drexel at a 10% discount. Current online programs offered to IEEE
members through Drexel e-Learning, the university's online subsidiary,
include Masters of Science in Information Science/Systems and Management
and Certificate Programs
 
In 2000 Drexel became the first major U.S. university to operate a fully
wireless CyberCampus. The e-Learning program draws on the Drexel's 110-year
tradition in preparing engineers for successful careers. Drexel is one of
America's leading private, non-profit academic and research institutions.
 
Applications, course prerequisites, and systems requirements are detailed
at the Drexel-supplied website for IEEE members. You must use your IEEE
member number to receive the 10% discount.
 
Enter through the IEEE Educational Partners,
http://www.ieee.org/EduPartners, and choose Drexel from the university
partners. To learn more about the IEEE Education Partners Program contact
Sasha Eydlin, IEEE Educational Activities, s.eydlin@ieee.org.
 
5. Tell your local schools about the 2003 IEE Faraday Lecture North American Downlink.
It's time to get the 2003 Institution of Electrical Engineers (IEE) Faraday
Lecture on your local school schedule. Many North American schools and
school districts depend on the Lecture to enhance their science and
technology curricula. Let your local school know that this is available
from IEEE.
 
"Fighting Crime with Science: Footprints, Fingerprints, and Forensics,"
the live 2003 IEE Faraday Lecture will be available for downlink from
Educational Activities on 4 February 2003 at 1:00 p.m. EST.
 
The 2003 IEE Faraday Lecture explores the role of science and technology in
the arena of crime detection and prevention. The Lecture will involve the
onsite audience, using them as onstage witnesses, suspects, and
investigators. The lecture will take the unique form of a murder
investigation. The event will use optics to construct a 3D computer model
of the crime scene, look at how suspects can be identified by DNA and other
forensic techniques. The Lecture is a joint production by IEE and the
Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council of Great Britain.
 
The 2003 Faraday Lecture will be simulcast live to both C-band and KU-band
satellites. For more information on how to receive this broadcast contact
Celeste Torres, c.torres@ieee.org, or go to
www.ieee.org/eab/precollege/faraday.
 
Lynn Murison
Outreach Coordinator, IEEE Educational Activities
www.ieee.org/organizations/eab/
 
IEEE CAREER ALERT for 25 September 2002
 
Your weekly report on jobs, education, management, and the
engineering workplace, from the editors of IEEE Spectrum
______________________________________________________
 
1. Why Consult?
For the working professional, consulting can fill a career
completely, expand opportunities, and actually improve job security.
For the organization, bringing in independent contractors can help
balance staff and workload. Here's what one seasoned consultant has
to say about his chosen career path's rewards and responsibilities:
 
<http://www.ewh.ieee.org/soc/ems/emr/archives/issues2002/oxer02v30n1.htm
l>
 
2. The Nuts and Bolts of Consulting
 
Some 7 percent of IEEE members consult full-time, and many more do so
part-time. As veteran consultants know well, but rookies may not, one
has to be vigilant to avoid being taken advantage of by clients and
stay at the top of one's game. Read on at:
 
<http://www.todaysengineer.org/Sept02/consulting4.htm>
 
[Note: this is the last of a four-part series on consulting; the
other three parts are linked to the online article.]
 
3. Networking for Consultants
 
For the self-employed engineer, networking is especially important.
The IEEE-USA fosters local networks (and we don't mean LANs) through
its Alliance of IEEE Consultants' Networks Coordinating Committee.
See what resources they have to offer at:
 
<http://www.ieeeusa.org/business/aicn.menu.html>
 
4. How Much Do IT Consultants Charge?
 
An on-line survey, sponsored by the IEEE-USA, is attempting to answer
that question. Back in 1998, the last time such a poll was taken,
respondents reported hourly rates ranging from US $35 to $250, with
an average of $97.80. Individual responses to this year's survey will
be kept confidential, and final results will be posted on the
IEEE-USA Web site.
 
To complete the 17-question survey, visit
<http://www.ieeeusa.org/business/consultants/directory/2002feesurvey.htm
l>
 
*IEEE-USA TODAY* September 2002
1. IEEE-USA PRESIDENT'S COLUMN: HELPING THE UNEMPLOYED MEMBER
 
LeEarl A. Bryant outlines various IEEE-USA initiatives aimed at lowering
engineering unemployment, including a one-stop website for addressing all
of the organization's employment resources.
 
Read the IEEE-USA President's Column at
http://www.ieeeusa.org/newspubs/presidentscolumn/bryantsep02.html.
 
Go to the one-stop website for employment at
http://www.ieeeusa.org/careers/help/.
 
2. ACTION ALERT: IEEE-USA CALLS ON U.S. IEEE MEMBERS TO ENGAGE LAWMAKERS ON
UNEMPLOYMENT
 
In response to rising engineering unemployment, IEEE-USA is calling on U.S.
IEEE members to write their U.S. Representatives and Senators in order to
educate them on how unemployment affects engineers, and to urge lawmakers
to take action.
 
Go to the Legislative Action Center and make your voice heard at
http://capwiz.com/ieeeusa/issues/alert/?alertid=435666&type=CO.
 
3. IEEE-USA SEEKS SAFEGUARDS AGAINST MISUSE OF HEALTH INFORMATION
 
IEEE-USA supports introducing additional safeguards into currently drafted
legislation or tightening current U.S. Department of Health and Human
Services privacy regulations to protect against the misuse of genetic and
other health information by employers.
 
Go to the news release at http://ieeeusa.org/releases/2002/082602pr.html.
 
4. SEPT. EDITION OF *IEEE-USA TODAY'S ENGINEER* WEBZINE SPANS
ENTREPRENEURSHIP TO BROADBAND
 
Additional articles cover "Setting Yourself Apart With Soft Skills,"
"Successful *Paid* Consulting," and "Biotechnology: The Key to Sustainable
Global Development."
 
Go to the latest Sept. issue at http://www.todaysengineer.org.
 
5. U.S. IEEE STUDENT MEMBER CONCLUDES MASS MEDIA FELLOWSHIP
 
U.S. IEEE member Rob Barnett, a graduate student studying electrical
engineering at Clemson University, concluded his 10-week media fellowship
assignment this summer at *Popular Science* with a presentation at the
American Association for the Advancement of Science in Washington, D.C.
 
Go to the news release at http://ieeeusa.org/releases/2002/090402pr.html.
 
6. 'IEEE-USA IN THE NEWS' SPOTLIGHTS CAREER/POLICY MEDIA COVERAGE
 
Every week, issues IEEE-USA champions for U.S. IEEE members are covered in
newspapers, magazines and electronic media worldwide.
 
For the latest IEEE-USA coverage in *ComputerWorld*, Cox Newspapers and
*The Minneapolis Star Tribune*, go to
http://ieeeusa.org/newspubs/inthenews.html.
 
*EXTRA*: 'VOICES OF INNOVATION'--IEEE MEMBERS NEEDED FOR RADIO PROGRAM ON
ENGINEERING WONDERS
 
VOICES OF INNOVATION, two-minute spots featuring engineers talking about
their innovations, careers and work, are now being aired on local public
and commercial radio stations. If you have an idea that could help improve
the public's understanding and awareness of engineering, your story could
join this exciting new program. To listen to the spots currently being
aired and to participate in the American Association of Engineering
Societies-sponsored project, go to http://www.voicesofinnovation.org.
 
 
President's Column, September 2002
 
Helping the Unemployed Member
 
Are you unemployed? Afraid you might be in the near future? Trying to
encourage and assist those who are? If so, you might think that IEEE-USA
and the rest of the IEEE have really not shown much activity toward
assisting our members. No matter how much we've done, we can never do
enough. Enough would include forecasts of engineering employment downturns
and the industries affected, forecasts of skills that will remain in demand
during expected downturns, and effective policy actions that will smooth
the ups and downs of engineering employment, and not inflate the
engineering workforce to the point of employment risks for those in the
profession.
 
Doing enough would also mean that IEEE-USA, other engineering
organizations, employers, and educators would work as a team to identify
available cost-effective training programs on subjects that the employers
will accept as meeting their present and near-term needs for engineers and
computer scientists. If we were doing enough, we would also have an
abundance of materials and section-level activities that would assist
members in understanding how to become pro-active in developing your
long-term career viability plan and the resources for helping to carry
through with successful plans.
 
If you wonder why you haven't been deluged with communications from
IEEE-USA on how to get your next employment opportunity, it's simply
because I didn't feel that we had accomplished enough that you would
consider of value. The good news is that IEEE-USA volunteers have developed
a multitude of resources over the years that are still available for the
benefit of our members. Our first challenge is to review and update these
materials and make sure that they are easily accessible at our Web site.
Our second challenge is to add resources.
 
IEEE-USA now has a user-friendly Web site for accessing our employment
assistance resources and selected resources that may assist you in planning
your longer-term career: http://www.ieeeusa.org/careers/help/. Other career
resources include:
 
IEEE Job Site ? employment listings: http://jobs.ieee.org/recruiter.html
 
Engineer's Guide to Lifelong Employability ? ordering information; free
unemployed members: http://www.ieeeusa.org/catalog/lifelong.html
 
Alliance of IEEE-USA Consultants' Networks (AICN) ? attend local CN
meetings for ideas on how to network, market yourself, find employment
opportunities and role models, and learn about contracting and consulting:
http://www.ieeeusa.org/business/aicn.menu.html
 
IEEE-USA Consultants Database ? This premier service matches prospective
clients with the world's finest electrotechnology and
information-technology professionals-for-hire:
http://www.ieeeusa.org/business/consultants
 
Careers and Education ? http://www.ieeeusa.org/careers/
 
USAJOBS ? This is the U.S. Federal Government's official one-stop source
for Federal jobs and employment information: http://www.usajobs.opm.gov/
 
Professional Career Time Line ?
http://www.ieeeusa.org/newspubs/features/careertimeline.htm
 
10 Reasons to Become a Professional Engineer ? lists advantages for
becoming a registered engineer http://www.ieeeusa.org/careers/ieeepep1.ppt.
 
SHORT-TERM EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES
 
Are there any real areas to focus on in the short term for available jobs?
As far as I can tell, present employment opportunities are defense
contracting, security contracting, government agencies ? primarily related
to defense and security ? and precollege education. I also understand there
is a need for government patent examiners, but you must be willing to
relocate to the Washington, D.C., area.
 
At this time, I must admit that the best resources and encouragement for
the unemployed and underemployed are those closest to home. Thus, I
challenge you to take the time to communicate with and encourage those you
know who are unemployed. The hand of friendship, understanding and sharing
of yourself are the most important gifts you can give to those searching
for jobs. The second category of important gifts includes job leads and
networking leads. In addition, you can extend these gifts by volunteering
in these capacities for your section.
 
Even though I am late with this communication, I believe that IEEE-USA now
has a team in place that is achieving a level of synergism that should
provide some guidance for developing winning strategies and attitudes while
job searching, and pointers to employment opportunity resources.
 
EMPLOYMENT ASSISTANCE TEAM
 
IEEE-USA's informal employment assistance team is directed by Bob Adams,
vice president for member activities, and Lee Stogner, vice president for
member services, with work performed by members and staff representatives
of the Employment and Career Services Committee, our Communications
Committee, and our Professional Activities Committee for Engineers (PACE)
coordinating Committee.
 
Our PACE Committee, chaired by Don Hill, is responsible for communicating
with and activating members of the IEEE-USA PACE Network. The PACE Network
is comprised of members of the IEEE-USA PACE coordinating Committee,
Regions 1-6 PACE Committees, and section/chapter PACE representatives.
Ideally, the local PACE representatives include local employment
coordinators. The latter are local volunteers who have accepted the
responsibility of ensuring that IEEE-USA employment assistance resources
are communicated locally, and will work to assist those who are unemployed.
If your section doesn't have an employment coordinator, please ask them to
find one. As a minimum, your section's PACE chair should have already
received communications on this subject from your regional PACE chair.
 
Ken Doniger is the recently appointed chair of our Employment and Career
Services Committee. The committee, which develops and identifies employment
assistance resources, is reviewing the existing resources (listed above)
and updating as quickly as possible. The committee has studied the Quick
Response Team (QRT) resource that was sponsored by sections experiencing
high unemployment. With this local section sponsorship, QRT traveled to the
location and presented workshops on how to prepare for and get your next
job.
 
Since most major corporations have services similar to those provided by
the QRT, the Employment and Career Services Committee decided to update
some of the presentations associated with the QRT workshops and to make
them available in Power-Point form for those sections/chapters that need to
provide such a workshop for their members. The updated QRT modules cover
the job interview, resumes, and cover letters. Your section, chapter or
region can obtain copies of these PowerPoint presentations by contacting
staff member Scott Grayson at s.grayson@ieee.org.
 
The Employment and Career Services Committee is also reviewing other
employment related resources and updating as appropriate. In addition, the
committee is working with the rest of the Employment Assistance Team to
identify other activities that may shorten the time required for members to
obtain their next job.
 
The committee sent out the IEEE-USA 2002 Employment Survey over the web on
29 July with notification to approximately 3,800 U.S. IEEE members who
signed up for the unemployment dues discount. With the employment climate
worsening for technical professionals, IEEE-USA conducted the survey to
determine the current causes and characteristics of engineering
unemployment and to discover what techniques are proving most effective for
regaining employment. All data has been collected and will be available
soon. It will be shared with the Workforce Committee and the Career Policy
Committee. If the PACE Committee thinks they have a role, it will be made
available to it as well.
 
The last committee with a major role on the Employment Assistance Team is
our Communications Committee. These volunteers and staffers have the
responsibility of working with other team members to identify available
resources and help to carry the messages to our members ? you, Regions 1-6,
our sections and our PACE Network.
 
Now, there are other members of the team who are often unknown and remain
nameless. They are the backbone of our organization ? you. Without you we
wouldn't have a reason for being and wouldn't have means for fulfilling the
responsibilities of a 501-C3, nonprofit technical society. With your
assistance we can assist our unemployed members, identify and develop
resources, and make a changes for the better of our membership and society
by having a strong and viable U.S. workforce of skilled and talented
electrical and computer science engineers and associated professionals. If
you have ideas that we should be pursuing, you can let us know by
contacting me at president@ieeeusa.org.
 
OTHER RELATED CAREER/PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES
 
This e-mail is focusing on employment resources for our members. Don't
forget that we are also working on policy and related issues that do not
specifically address short-term employment needs. The two primary
committees in this area are the Workforce Committee, chaired by Sylvia
Thomas, and our Career Policy Committee chaired by long-term career
activist George McClure. These two committees are conducting a survey on
skills identified over the past few months on engineering-placement ads,
designing ads for a select number of major newspapers to increases
out-reach to members in areas of high unemployment, increasing
communications with Congress on issues related to engineering unemployment,
and to sponsor a national workshop on the status of the engineering
workforce.
 
Again, if you have ideas on what we should be doing or how we could do it
better, please let me know. Also, don't be afraid to volunteer as one of
those who can bring about change. And if you still don't have a clue of
what should be done, study your IEEE election ballot and vote for the
members who can take IEEE-USA and our Institute in the direction that you
think we should be going.
 
Canadian company, Omniz Global Knowledge Corporation, has joined the IEEE
Education Partners Program.
 
Available at a 10% discount to IEEE members are six technical courses,
referred to as multimedia books, which are presented in a combination of
CDROM and print. All six courses were developed by IEEE members Drs Michel
Nakhla and Ram Achar, who are faculty in Electrical Engineering at Carleton
University.
 
The current course list centers on signal integrity, with difficulty levels
ranging from introductory to highly technical. The multimedia books cover
such topics as macromodeling, principles of SPICE based simulation,
transient analysis, and Krylov-Subspace Techniques. Each comes with exams
to measure learning. The exams are graded and solutions are provided. The
CD ROM format allows students to proceed at their own pace.
 
IEEE Fellow, Professor Nakhla, is one of the leading researchers in the
world in the area of high-speed interconnect analysis. IEEE member Dr.
Achar has received awards on his work on high-speed circuit and
interconnect analysis, including the highly regarded Natural Science &
Engineering Research Council doctoral award. They have both been published
widely.
 
To receive the member discount and to read the course syllabi, go to
www.ieee.org/EduPartners, look under corporate partners. For further
information on this program, contact Sasha Eydlin, s.eydlin@ieee.org.
 
Lynn Murison
Outreach Coordinator, IEEE Educational Activities
www.ieee.org/organizations/eab/
 
 
IEEE Student Member Concludes IEEE-USA / AAAS Media Fellowship
 
WASHINGTON (4 September, 2002) - IEEE member Rob Barnett, a graduate
student in electrical engineering at Clemson University, concluded his
media fellowship with a recent presentation at the American Association for
the Advancement of Science (AAAS) building in Washington.
 
Barnett, the third IEEE-USA / AAAS Media Fellow served his fellowship
at Popular Science magazine in New York. He has two articles, "Power Train"
and "Hug an Invertebrate" appearing in the October issue. Barnett, who is
specializing in power engineering, said improved communication skills are
important for all engineers.
 
"Even if they're not interested in writing, a lot of engineers lack
communication skills," said Barnett, who has been asked to free-lance for
Popular Science. "So a program like this is good for developing those
skills."
 
The AAAS Mass Media Science & Engineering Fellows Program has produced
more than 400 alumni and will enter its 30th year next summer. It is
designed to strengthen the connections between scientists and journalists
by placing advanced science students in newsrooms across the country. For
more information, contact Katrina Malloy at +1 202 326 6670 or go to
http://ehrweb.aaas.org/massmedia.htm.
 
For more information on the IEEE-USA / AAAS Media Fellows Program, go
to http://www.ieeeusa.org/newspubs/massmedia.html.

 

 
Link for Arthur Winston as IEEE President-Elect
 As you may know, the IEEE Board of Directors recently nominated Dr.
Arthur Winston to be a candidate for the position of IEEE President
Elect for 2003. I believe it would be of benefit to the IEEE members in
your Section if you could make known to them Arthur's web site address
where they can find additional information about him. You may make a
link to it in your Section's web site or publish it in your newsletter.
 
His URL is: http://www.arthurwinston.com/
 
Please feel free to contact me if you have any questions.
 
Regards & Best of luck in your Section Activities for the coming year,
 
Bruce Hecht
- Vice-chair, IEEE Boston Section
  
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IEEE-USA is an organizational unit of the IEEE created in 1973 to
promote the careers and public-policy interests of the more than 230,000
electrical, electronics, computer and software engineers who are U.S.
members of the IEEE. The IEEE is the world's largest technical professional
society with over 360,000 members in 150 countries. For more information,
visit us online at http://www.ieeeusa.org.
  
***********************
IEEE-USA
1828 L Street, NW, Suite 1202
Washington, DC 20036-5104
Tel: +1 202 785 0017
Fax: +1 202 785 0835
Web: http://www.ieeeusa.org
*********************** 
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Updated 09/30/2002