IEEE - SCOOP
Quarterly Issue Published for Section and Chapter Chairs
Vicki Waldman, Editor; Tracy Hawkins, Manager S/CS
For the latest web version of SCOOP, go to: www.ieee.org/ra/scs
and select the link for publications
 
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IN THIS ISSUE:
- INTERNET CONFERENCING SERVICE AVAILABLE
- IEEE DISPLAYS
- RESPONDING TO STUDENT NEEDS WORLDWIDE.
- NEW CAREER NEWSLETTER BEGINS PUBLICATION
- IEEE MEMBERS BENEFIT FROM RECRUITING NEW MEMBERS
- IEEE MEMBERS RECEIVING RENEWAL PACKAGES
- OCTOBER BRAIN TEASER, SEPTEMBER SOLUTION
- OCTOBER BRAIN TEASER, SEPTEMBER SOLUTION
- BRAIN TEASER CHALLENGE SOLUTION
- OCTOBER BRAIN TEASER
 
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INTERNET CONFERENCING SERVICE AVAILABLE
There is a great tool for available for Sections to use in reducing
conference costs! PlaceWare, Inc. has been engaged by the IEEE to provide
Internet conferencing services to all IEEE volunteers and entities (for
conducting IEEE business). Essentially, the attendees of an Internet
Conference see on their computer the content that is being discussed during
a live teleconference. The result is an efficient, appealing and effective
meeting at a minimal expense.
 
For a nominal fee and the cost of a phone call, you can host a session
providing live discussion, PowerPoint presentations, hold votes, poll the
audience, tour websites and share applications. Anyone with a phone and a
web browser can participate.
 
Each conference incurs a fee of $50 that includes use of the application
for a scheduled conference, administration of invitations and other
arrangements. The only other cost is the phone charge. For more
information about Internet conferencing, visit
http://www.ieee.org/web/webconf/. If you have any question or comments
about this program, please email to web-conf@ieee.org
 
 
IEEE DISPLAYS
Formerly known as the IEEE Cooperative Display Program, the new IEEE
Partnering Display Program offers support to conference efforts and member
recruitment. The program allows organizers to design their own display by
providing:
 
* IEEE brochures, catalogs, flyers and magazines
* IEEE membership applications and promotional gifts
* Free IEEE Society membership to new higher-grade members joining at the
conference
 
The IEEE Partnering Display Program will premier at the 2002 IEEE Sections
Congress, 18 ? 21 October, so check it out if you go! For more information
on the program, contact Beverly Banks, IEEE Sales & Marketing,
b.banks@ieee.org.
 
 
RESPONDING TO STUDENT NEEDS WORLDWIDE.
Through its Rapid Response Program, the IEEE Foundation is able to quickly
respond to funding requests under US$5,000 for projects and activities
related to IEEE student and young professional members. Three such
projects - a robotics competition in Chile, a four-day student workshop in
Spain, and student leadership conference in the United States, were awarded
a total of US$10,400 during September 2002. To learn more about how to
apply for a grant from the IEEE Foundation, go to
http://www.ieee.org/organizations/foundation/html/funding.html.
 
 
NEW CAREER NEWSLETTER BEGINS PUBLICATION
"IEEE Career Alert," a new weekly opt-in online newsletter, written by
"IEEE Spectrum" editors, is now available. The publication focuses on
issues such as professional growth opportunities, continuing education,
management and the engineering workplace. It also will include related
articles from "IEEE Spectrum," other IEEE resources and the Web. You can
sign up to subscribe at http://www.spectrum.ieee.org/careers/signup.html.
For additional information, contact Elizabeth A. Bretz, IEEE Spectrum,
telephone +1 212 419 7552, e.bretz@ieee.org.
 
"IEEE Spectrum Online" also has revamped the IEEE Web site career section,
found at http://www.spectrum.ieee.org/careers, to include easier navigation
and an articles archive, plus links to the IEEE Job Site at
http://jobs.ieee.org/index.html.
 
 
IEEE MEMBERS BENEFIT FROM RECRUITING NEW MEMBERS
The annual IEEE Member-Get-A-Member and Student-Get-A-Student recruitment
campaigns were launched 1 September. The campaigns, which will run through
the 2003 dues year, are designed to encourage members to recruit their
colleagues for IEEE membership. Recruitment incentives include credit
vouchers toward IEEE dues, IEEE Society fees, IEEE products and services,
and a chance to win one free year of IEEE membership. For more
information, visit http://www.ieee.org/organizations/rab/md/mgm.html.
 
 
IEEE MEMBERS RECEIVING RENEWAL PACKAGES
Current IEEE members have begun receiving their 2003 renewal information
and are also able to renew their memberships online at
http://www.ieee.org/renewal. Members may subscribe to the new IEEE Member
Digital Library when they renew.
 
OCTOBER BRAIN TEASER, SEPTEMBER SOLUTION - Butch Shadwell
EDITOR'S NOTE, correction: in the September issue of SCOOP, Butch
Shadwell's Section was incorrectly identified. While Butch's Brain Teaser
Challenges appear regularly in the IEEE Florida West Coast Section's
newsletter (The Suncoast Signal), Butch is a long-time volunteer and
current Chair of the Jacksonville Section in Florida. Quang Tang is the
current Chair of the Florida West Coast Section.
 
BRAIN TEASER CHALLENGE SOLUTION (September 2002 SCOOP)
Floyd had a great party in spite of the reduced balloon sizes. As it turns
out, 33 feet of water is about one atmosphere of pressure, so at that depth
the pressure on the balloon has doubled. If you will recall the ideal gas
law - PV=nRT. In our scenario all of the right-hand terms are constant so
we can write our equation as P1V1=P2V2. With this relationship defined, it
is obvious that as the pressure is doubled the volume must be halved. So,
the subsurface volume of the balloons is 0.5 cubic feet. Using the
equation for the volume of a sphere (4/3*pi*r3) we can calculate the
diameter of the balloon at the surface as 14.9". Repeating the calculation
for 0.5 cu ft we get 11.8" for a difference of 3.1". But I bet you already
knew that.
 
OCTOBER BRAIN TEASER
Tony had been dancing since before he could walk. Some even referred to
him as a dancing fool, but just not to his face. Tony may have been dealt
a few cards short of a full deck, but he wouldn't have anyone pointing it
out to him.
 
Besides dancing, Tony also liked scary sci-fi movies like "Alien". In the
trailers for that movie they used to say that "in space, no one can hear
you scream". Which of course is true. Tony was fond of pointing out to
folks that if they were watching him tap dance in space they wouldn't be
able to hear him, unless of course he was actually tap dancing on their
heads. It should go without saying that Tony, having these interests in
scary sci-fi movies and dancing, would also be a bit of a pyromaniac. (I'm
using some poetic license here. Give me a break.) So while discussing his
interests in dance, fire and outer space, it naturally came up what would
happen if a room with a smoke detector were suddenly vented into outer
space? In this scenario, there is no smoke in the room, just normal air at
STP, prior to the venting event. When the atmosphere is suddenly vented
would the smoke detector go off or not, regardless of whether anyone could
hear it? For this problem lets say it is an ionization type smoke detector
(not optical) and the humidity is zero. For extra credit, what if it was
an optical smoke detector?
 
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Updated 11/17/02