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Calendar Year 2014 Presentations






Wednesday, January 15th, 2014, 7:30 pm
Room M-114, Stanford University Medical School

Using Technology to Successfully Solve the Problems of the Aging
Walt Maclay
President and Chief Engineer of Voler Systems

Abstract:
Technology is now making a huge push into home health care. New markets are emerging as the traditional "aging in place" market continues to grow. New assistive technologies are being developed that will have an impact as well: communication devices, health and wellness monitoring, home safety and security. Product design must take in to account user capability, medical device regulations, and technology adoption issues. This talk with address the major issues for new devices in the home health and aging in place market. It will include resources, driving forces and latest trends for new technology development.

Biography:
Mr. Walt Maclay, President and Chief Engineer of Voler Systems, is committed to delivering quality electronic products on time and on budget. Voler Systems provides the integrated design, development and risk assessment of new devices for medical, industrial, aerospace and instrumentation applications.
Mr. Maclay is recognized as a domain expert in Silicon Valley technical consulting associations. He is an instructor for the Product Realization NPI Program. He has also been past President of the Professional and Technical Consultants Association (PATCA). He has applied his outstanding leadership to many multidisciplinary teams that have delivered quality electronic devices. Mr. Maclay holds a BSEE degree in Electrical Engineering from Syracuse University.





Wednesday, February 19th, 2014, 7:30 pm
Room M-114, Stanford University Medical School

Optional dinner location: Stanford Hospital Cafeteria, 6:15 PM (no host, no reservations)

The Development of A Wearable Cardiopulmonary Sensor System
Dr. Sam Eletr
Acting CEO, Rhythm Diagnostic Systems, Inc.

Abstract:
Rhythm Diagnostic Systems, Inc. began operations in August 2012, in the San Francisco Bay Area. It aims to offer very light, wearable, unobtrusive, band-aid-like, optionally reusable MultiSenseTM Strips that measure and record (and eventually transmit) a number of cardiopulmonary physiological parameters, as well as the wearer's relative physical exertion data. A proprietary design minimizes power consumption and thus reduces battery bulk to enhance comfort and wearability.

A company-owned manufacturing facility is currently producing, for an upcoming clinical trial, a run of recording Strips of about 100x27x3 mm, weighing less than 16g, and capable of detecting and recording up to ten days' worth of: Heart Rate, clinical quality ECG, Oxygen saturation, Respiratory Rate, relative respiration depth, relative level of physical exertion, and temperature, as well as positional information. Examples of these data will be shown. The recording Strip may be read directly following an ambulatory testing period, and its data interpreted within minutes in the physician's office using software available on a laptop or tablet. A real time transmitting version of this Strip is under development.

These MultiSenseTM Strips potentially address a number of applications and markets. These vary from the diagnoses of intermittent and asymptomatic/symptomatic arrhythmias in patients suspected of cardiac disorders, to the wireless monitoring of ICU/CCU patients and ambulatory in-hospital or in-hospice patients. Other applications include the screening of patients with sleep disorders, the monitoring of progress of athletes in training, or the watching over of a variety of professionals in stressful or risky situations.

Biography:
Dr. Eletr was a co- founder and first CEO of Applied Biosystems, Inc., whose DNA sequencers first enabled the sequencing of the human genome. He was also a co- founder of Lynx Therapeutics and a Board member of Solexa, the companies that gave birth to the other dominant DNA sequencing technology. More recently he was involved in the seeding of Population Genetics Technologies and Domain Therapeutics, companies whose Boards he chairs, and in the seeding and financing of Andrew Alliance, a pipetting automation robot company on whose Board he sits.





Wednesday, March 19th, 2014, 7:30 pm
Room M-114, Stanford University Medical School

Optional dinner location: Stanford Hospital Cafeteria, 6:15 PM (no host, no reservations)

The Whole is Greater than the Sum of the Parts: Nano-Patterned Lipid Particles for Targeted Drug Delivery Therapeutics
Jayakumar Rajadas, Ph.D.
Biomaterials and Advanced Drug Delivery Laboratory
Stanford Cardiovascular Pharmacology Division of Cardiovascular Institute

Abstract:
Lipids can self-assemble into higher-order functional structures such as membranes and vesicles. Different combinations of lipids can develop into different-sized lipids particles. When these particles interact with bio fluids such as blood and intestine secretions, they develop into structures of desired patterns that can recognize endothelial linings of the blood capillaries that are proximal to the affected tissues. This talk focuses on using such complex structures for the purpose of drug delivery to the heart, brain and liver. At the Biomaterials and Advanced Drug Delivery laboratory at Stanford, we have developed a Nano-carrier combination platform, consisting of lipids and serum proteins, to develop novel structures that can recognize impaired heart and liver tissues. For the first time, we have used this technology to stabilize fragile peptides, proteins and water-insoluble therapeutic molecules to target the delivery of these molecules to different organs.

Biography:
Dr. Jayakumar Rajadas is the founding director of Biomaterials and Advanced Drug Delivery Laboratory at Stanford University. Rajadas is currently working on the molecular mechanism of neurodegenerative disorders caused by aggregated tau and abeta proteins that are synergically involved in Alzheimer's disease development. He uses various biophysical approaches such as AFM, fluorescence, and NMR to understand the structural details of neurotoxic oligomeric forms of these two proteins. He has also used biophysical and pharmacology approaches to design the most optimal microenvironments for implanting stem cells, for the repair of injured skin and heart tissues. He has several biomedical product patents of his credit and six of them resulted in commercial ventures including four startup companies in Palo Alto. Before moving to Stanford, he served as the founding chair of the Bio-organic and Neurochemistry Division at one of India's leading national laboratories, Central Leather Research Institute at Chennai.





Wednesday, April 16th, 2014, 7:30 pm
Room M-114, Stanford University Medical School

Optional dinner location: Stanford Hospital Cafeteria, 6:15 PM (no host, no reservations)

Point of Care CD4 Testing and the BD FACSPresto™
Dr. Scott Bornheimer
BD Biosciences

Abstract:
The BD FACSPresto™ Near-Patient CD4 Counter* measures absolute CD4+ cell counts, %CD4, and total hemoglobin (Hb) from a single drop of fingerstick or venipuncture blood for staging and monitoring HIV patients. This system requires minimal training to operate and can process 10 tests per hour. Features include a user-friendly touchscreen, unitized dry reagent cartridge, onboard reagent and instrument QC, and automated data analysis. This talk will discuss the technology and preliminary performance of the BD FACSPresto system in testing HIV patient samples.
*Product under development, not available for sale or use

Biography:
Dr. Bornheimer received a Ph.D. in Chemistry and Biochemistry from the University of California, San Diego focused on investigating heterotrimeric G-protein signaling through mathematical modeling, fluorescent biosensors, and live cell imaging. Since that time he has led a group in point of care diagnostics at BD Biosciences in development of the BD FACSPresto.





Wednesday, May 21st, 2014, 7:30 pm
Room M-114, Stanford University Medical School

Optional dinner location: Stanford Hospital Cafeteria, 6:15 PM (no host, no reservations)

Rotating Magnet Localization of Medical Devices1
Roger Hastings, Ph.D.
Consulting Scientist

Abstract:
A small magnet placed within a medical device is rotated via currents in a stator winding that surrounds the magnet. The rotating magnetic field surrounding the rotating magnet can be strong enough to be sensed outside of the patient's body using inexpensive commercially available magnetic sensors. A small array of magnetic sensors generates data that may be inverted to determine both the location and orientation of the rotating magnet, and thus the coordinates of the medical device relative to the fixed sensor array. Tracking and guidance of the medical device relative to a real time and/or pre-operative image is thereby facilitated. Advantages of rotating magnet localization relative to GPS type localization systems include reduced cost, size and weight of capital equipment, reduced interference from metallic objects entering patient area, reduced operator and patient exposure to AC magnetic fields, and potentially more accurate determination of device coordinates. Calculations and estimates for a model system will be provided to illustrate these points.
1. "Systems and Methods for Determining the Position and Orientation of Medical Devices Inserted into a Patient", US Patent Application Publication #US2011/0144479 A1, June 16, 2011.

Biography:
Dr. Hastings has worked in the medical device field for 25 years in the areas of urology, cardiology, electrophysiology, and neurosurgery medical devices and systems. As VP of R&D at NxThera, Inc. Roger developed systems for thermal ablation of prostate cancer, starting in 2011. He developed vascular imaging technology and wireless pacing technology at Boston Scientific from 2004 to 2011. From 1998 to 2004 he served as Chief Scientific Officer and Vice President of Clinical Development at Stereotaxis, developing clinical applications and technology for an interventional robot system. Roger joined Scimed Life Systems in 1991, founding their Alternative Technologies group, and serving as manager and director of R&D through 1998. He has participated in the development of many commercial medical products, and is currently consulting with medical start-up companies, including NxThera, on medical device therapies.

Prior to entering the medical device field, Roger worked as a Scientist and Engineering Manager at Sperry Corporation, developing magnetic sensing technology for defense systems. In 1989 he founded Electro-Magnetics Design, Inc.. Dr. Hastings received his bachelors and masters degrees in physics at the University of Denver, and his Ph.D. in physics at the University of Minnesota in 1975. Following a post-doctoral fellowship at the University of Virginia, he became Assistant and then Associate Professor of Physics at North Dakota State University.

Dr. Hastings holds 114 issued United States patents, with 111 pending and published patent applications. He has authored numerous publications, and spoken widely at Universities and technical conferences throughout his career.





Wednesday, June 18th, 2014, 7:30 pm
Room M-114, Stanford University Medical School

Optional dinner location: Stanford Hospital Cafeteria, 6:15 PM (no host, no reservations)

The History of DNA Sequencing Using Nanoscopic Pores in Membranes
David Deamer
University of California at Santa Cruz

Abstract:
When a voltage is imposed across a thin membrane containing a nanoscopic pore, the electric field generated within the pore captures linear ionized polymers, such as nucleic acids, that are present in the solution bathing the pore. The nucleic acid molecule transiently blocks ionic current as it is translocated through the pore, and modulation of the current during translocation provides information about the structure and dynamic motion of the molecule. If a DNA-processing enzyme such as a polymerase is present, the enzyme-DNA complex is drawn to the pore. The polymerase replicates the nucleic acid, pulling one strand through the pore as a molecular rachet. The ionic current modulations identify each of the four bases, allowing the base sequence of the DNA to be determined. In April, 2014, Oxford Nanopore Technology distributed the first commercial nanopore sequencing instrument to early users. My talk will trace the history of nanopore sequencing from the initial concept to future applications in genomics and personalized medical diagnostics.

Biography:
David Deamer is Research Professor of Biomolecular Engineering at the University of California, Santa Cruz. His undergraduate degree was in Chemistry at Duke University, Durham NC (1961) and his Ph.D. in Physiological Chemistry from the Ohio State University School of Medicine (1965). Following post-doctoral research at UC Berkeley, he joined the faculty at UC Davis in 1967. In 1994 he moved his laboratory to UC Santa Cruz. Prof. Deamer's research area concerns the manner in which an applied voltage can be used to drive DNA molecules through nanoscopic pores in membranes.





Wednesday, September 17th, 2014, 7:30 pm
Room M-114, Stanford University Medical School

Optional dinner location: Stanford Hospital Cafeteria, 6:15 PM (no host, no reservations)

Modeling Health Behaviors Using Mobile Sensing
Anmol Madan
Co-founder and CEO, Ginger.io

Abstract:
Mobile phones are a pervasive platform for opportunistic sensing of social and health related behaviors. In this talk, I discuss how sensor data from mobile phones can be used to model and predict health outcomes. The talk starts with a review of research at the MIT Media Lab, and then transitions into how Ginger.io has built a commercial platform to collect, annotate, analyze and drive healthcare interventions at scale, deployed with major US hospital systems and healthcare providers.

The Ginger.io three-part platform -- patient app, behavioral analytics engine, and provider dashboard -- applies this technolgy to give care providers a window into their patients' health between office visits. Our mobile app uses smartphone sensors to passively collect information about a patient's daily patterns. Using this data, our machine learning models are able to detect at-risk patients significantly better than the standard of care. Any concerning changes in behavior are communicated to the provider through our simple, action-oriented web dashboard. Ginger.io is part of the care solutions at instituions such as Kaiser Permanente, Novant Health, UCSF, Duke Medical and Cincinnati Children's.

Biography:
Anmol Madan is co-founder and CEO at Ginger.io, and currently leads the overall product vision and business strategy. Anmolhas extensive research experience in modeling large-scale human behavior data using statistical and pattern recognition methods, and commercialization of these technologies. His past research has been featured in academic publications in computer science such as IEEE Pervasive, ACM Ubicomp, Science, and is frequently cited in popular media and press. He received his PhD from the Media Lab, at MIT (with Alex Pentland), and also worked at Microsoft. He is a frequent speaker on the topics of behavioral analytics, data privacy, and healthcare entrepreneurship.





Wednesday, October 15th, 2014, 7:30 pm
Room M-114, Stanford University Medical School

Optional dinner location: Stanford Hospital Cafeteria, 6:15 PM (no host, no reservations)

Electrodes in the Brain — Where Do You Want To Put Them and How Do You Get Them There?
Eric E. Sabelman
Kaiser Permanente Hospital

Abstract:
The technology for chronic brain recording and stimulating electrodes is advancing, as is the range of diseases for which such electrodes may provide symptomatic relief. This presentation will briefly review electrode construction and the indications warranting electrode implantation. The principal topic to be covered will be surgical implantation of deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrodes, beginning with selecting a target for the electrode based on a patient's pre-operative imaging, and planning a (relatively) safe trajectory from anentry point on the skull. The several varieties of stereotactic hardware employed to insert an electrode – some time-tested, some new and "improved" – will be discussed. The older stereotactic frames and newer "frameless" devices have been designed to address different constraints – optimizing accuracy, ease of use, disposability vs. reusability, or compatibility with magnetic resonance imaging, but never all of these simultaneously. Finally, means for confirming the final location of an electrode and providing this information to caregivers and patients to aid in achieving the best possible therapy will be described.

Biography:
Eric E. Sabelman, PhD, is a biomedical engineer in the Neurosurgery Dept of Kaiser Permanente Hospital iin Redwood City, California, implementing technology for Deep Brain Stimulation to aid patients with Parkinsons Disease. He is an adjunct instructor at Santa ClaraUniversity School of Engineering, where he teaches a graduate course in biomaterials for medical device design. Previously, he was a principal investigator at the VA Palo Alto Rehabilitation R&D Center, where he was responsible for peer-reviewed projects in the development of microsensor-based human body motion analysis, tactile sensors, acute spinal cord injury patient care, and tissue engineering for nerve repair and reconstructive surgery. He is also an independent design consultant under the name "Pro-Zooics Research"; projects for clients have been in forensic biomechanics, emergency medical equipment, wearable dataloggers, ergonomics, space biology and industrial biotechnology. His experience includes positions as Consulting Associate Professor at Stanford University Medical School and research staff of Collagen Corporation, University of California-San Francisco Medical School, and NASA-Ames Research Center and Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Dr. Sabelman received his Ph.D. degree in bioengineering from Stanford University in 1976. He is the author of more than 50 papers and conference presentations and has been awarded four patents.





Wednesday, November 19th, 2014, 7:30 pm
Room M-114, Stanford University Medical School

Optional dinner location: Stanford Hospital Cafeteria, 6:15 PM (no host, no reservations)

Phys-Engi-Preneur: The Neverending Metamorphosis
Giacomo Vacca
President, Kinetic River Corporation

Abstract:
At the age of 8 I decided I wanted to be a scientist. After becoming one, new opportunities and realities became apparent to me — prompting the first of several metamorphoses. The good thing about not being a caterpillar is that you can do it again. The bad thing about not being a caterpillar is that you may have to do it again. Join me in an exploration of life paths, career choices, and professional transformation.

Biography:
Giacomo Vacca earned physics degrees from Harvard University (BA/MA) and from Stanford University (PhD). His dissertation, with Nobel Prize winner Bob Laughlin, introduced a new ultrafast optical technique for investigating microscopic fluid phenomena. He has set up whole laboratories from scratch, started and led development programs, generated intellectual property (45 patent applications, 26 pending, 9 awarded), led diverse interdisciplinary groups, and managed IP portfolios. At Abbott Labs, Dr. Vacca invented and developed Laser Rastering, a radically innovative concept in flow cytometry that yielded the fastest flow cytometer in the world. A Senior Member of the Optical Society of America and past Abbott Research Fellow, Dr. Vacca founded and runs Kinetic River, a biophotonics design and product development company focusing on cell analysis and in vitro diagnostics. Recently he also cofounded BeamWise, a provider of design automation tools for biophotonics and other complex optical systems.








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