2012 Events

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September 25, 2012 Joint IEEE CPMT/IEEE Photonics Soc. Meeting: "The Art and Science of Packaging High-Coupling Photonics Devices and Modules" by Prof. Wood-Hi Cheng, IEEE Distinguished Speaker

Abstract

A new scheme of double-variable-curvature (DVCM) employing a single-step grinding technique with fully automatic process for efficient and high-average coupling from high-power 980-nm lasers into single mode fibers is reported. The DVCM exhibited a double-variable curvature in the major and minor axes. The perfect DVCM precisely controls both grinding offset less then 0.5 mm and minor radius curvature of 2.4 - 3.5 mm that leads to high-average coupling efficiency of 84.5%. This demonstrates tha thigh-average coupling efficiency through single-step grinding with fully automatic fabrication of the DVCM is better than any other grinding techniques to form asymmetric microlenses. From art (or engineering) point of view, we are able to fabricate any kinds of perfect fiber microlenses.

Mode (spot size and phasefront) mismatch between the laser diodes and single-mode fibers (SMFs) can lead to a significant insertion loss. However, limited information is available for the quantitative understanding of the phasefront match between laser diodes and fibers. Here, a direct near-field phase and intensity measurement in diode lasers, SMFs, and DVCMs is demonstrated by employing a SMF interferometer. From science point of view, detailed understanding of the near-field phase and intensity distributions of light sources and optical components are essential for designs of microoptics with better mode matching to minimize the insertion loss.

September 17, 2012: "HIGH POWER FIBER LASERS" by Dr. Dahv Kliner, JDSU

Abstract

Fiber lasers and amplifiers are having a major impact in a remarkably wide variety of applications and have exhibited the highest market growth rate among laser technologies for several years. Starting in the 1990‚?Ts with the revolution in optical telecommunications triggered by development of the erbium-doped fiber amplifier, fiber sources are now enabling numerous applications because of their uniquely practical combination of optical and physical characteristics. Rapid advances in attainable power and energy, in wavelength coverage, and in temporal, spectral, and polarization control of fiber sources have resulted from technical innovations in a number of areas, including fiber design and fabrication, fiber processing techniques, laser architectures and pumping methods, fiber-based components, modeling, and fundamental understanding of key physical processes. This presentation will begin with an introduction to fiber lasers, including review of key components and technologies. We will discuss approaches to power scaling of fiber sources while maintaining diffraction-limited beam quality. We will then summarize the primary market drivers and advantages of fiber lasers in comparison with other laser technologies. Finally, we will discuss the design and performance of JDSU‚?Ts kW fiber lasers, including both production and R&D versions; we will show applications in metal cutting, the largest market for high-power fiber lasers.c

August 7, 2012: "The Kepler Mission: Zeroing in on Habitable Earths" by Douglas Caldwell, Kepler Instrument Scientist, SETI Institute

Abstract

NASA's Kepler Mission was launched on March 6, 2009 with the goal of determining the frequency of Earth-size planets in the habitable zone of solar-like stars. Kepler continuously and simultaneously monitors over 150,000 stars using a 0.95 meter Schmidt telescope and a 95 megapixel CCD camera searching for the small change in brightness as a planet transits its host star. The driving design requirement was the ability to detect the 84 parts-per-million signal from an Earth-size planet transit. As such, stability of the instrument and continuity of the data are keys for success. Kepler has been collecting data for over three years and has already revolutionized the field of extrasolar planets, detecting over 2,300 planet candidates, the first Earth-size planets, the first circumbinary planets, and over 360 multiple-planet systems. The project was recently awarded a mission extension by NASA so that Kepler can continue collecting data and results for another four years.

June 5, 2012: "Color as a human response to the physical world" by Mark Butterworth, Optical Scientist, Philips Lumileds

Abstract

Color is a human response to the physical world and not usually taught in physics class. My goal is to make this fun and informative. I will start with the human visual system. How the eye and retina see the world and how the brain interprets this data. Learn how color science evolved from the 1800's to the present day and discover where CIE XYZ, xyz, Yxy, uv, 'u'v', Lab and CCT came from.

Biography

Mark Butterworth is currently Optical Scientist at Philips Lumileds working on phosphors and packaging used in high power LEDs. With 32 years of color science and optoelectronics experience, he has held various management and engineering positions at companies like Hewlett-Packard, Agilent Technologies and Flextronics. Areas of research include digital cameras, scanners, printers, television, projection displays, and luminescent devices. He has degrees in Physics and Mathematics and holds 31 patents.

May 1, 2012: "The 2012 SCV Photonics Society Lecture in Entrepreneurship" by Don Scifres

Abstract

Don Scifres was the rare individual who was able to invent a new class of product (the high power semiconductor laser), then founded a joint venture with just a few people, and grew it to a company of thousands of people that was acquired by JDSU in Feb 2001 for $41B. Most of the growth took place during just three years: 1998-2000. In this story is a remarkable case study of what it takes to overcome the usual barriers to growth, to re-invent the organization, and do whatever it takes to keep up with the demand ramp. Join us to hear the story of how Don and his team accomplished this, and his advice for entrepreneurs today. He will also talk about his current investments through SDL Ventures, and what areas he believes are promising for future investment.

April 3, 2012: "Highly Efficient, Miniature, and Low Cost Green Lasers Based on Second Harmonic Generationce holder" by John Khaydarov, VP of Laser Engineering, Spectralus Corporation

Abstract

Growing pico-projector market demands RGB light engine based products with higher brightness and longer battery life. Laser-based pico-projectors can meet both requirements. Blue and red semiconductor direct lasers with wavelengths of 445nm and 640nm are available from a number of vendors. At the same time direct green diode lasers that are available now still lack efficiency andoutput power required for the efficient projectors with high brightness of more than 20 lumens. In RGB light source, a green laser is the major lumen provider, therefore development and production of compact, efficient, low cost and high power green laser is critical for commercialization of laser picoprojectors.

He will discuss progress in development of the low-cost, highly efficient miniature diodepumped solid-state (DPSS) green laser sources for pico-projectors and other consumer electronics applications with wavelength 532nm.

Biography

Dr. John Khaydarov has been leading laser design, development, and productization at Spectralus Corporation since 2007. He has more than 20 years of experience in solid-state lasers, widely tunable optical parametric devices, nonlinear and fiber optics, and high-speed fiber-optical telecommunications. Before joining Spectralus John held senior engineering positions at Continuum Electro-Optics and Optimight Communications where he led development of numerous commercially-successful solid-state laser and tunable products for industrial, scientific, medical, and telecommunication markets.

March 6, 2012: "Overview of radiation sources for Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography" by Dr. Oleg Khodykin, KLA-Tencor

Abstract

Next generation lithography has become more difficult with each succeeding dimensional shrink, and a transition to a shorter excitation wavelength, using an extreme ultraviolet (EUV) source is overdue.† Unfortunately, the source remains the primary bottleneck; a minimum of 100W will be needed, with 250W for high volume production, to obtain the customary tool throughput.† To date, only 30W of source power has been reported.† Our speaker will discuss the two main types of EUV sources: one using laser excitation of a metal droplet to form a plasma (LPP), the other using an arc that vaporizes a plasma by a high energy electrical discharge (DPP) or related approaches.† He will discuss the shortcomings of each approach.† Then he will discuss the laser excitation source in more detail, and go into the engineering problems that need solved to increase the power, increase the system uptime, and bring the source into production.

Biography

Dr. Oleg Khodykin holds a doctorate and master degree, both in physics, from Moscow Physical-Technical Institute, Russia.† Currently, he is employed at KLA-Tencor , as manager of EUV source development for next generation mask inspection tools. Prior joining KLA-Tencor, he spent 10 years at CYMER , working on experimental development and engineering of EUV source for lithography applications. He currently holds 25 patents related to EUV source development.